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PATIENT CARE


Within the next 10 years, doctors may start using artificial intelligence (AI) in every sphere of their work.


l 1. Educate employees about cyber security: All healthcare staff, including doctors, should frequently be trained on cyber security best practices. The weak links during any attack are often employees, and it’s usually through them that criminals gain an initial foothold. Hosting a training program at least once every six months will go a long way in protecting the entire organisation from cyber crime.


l 2. Implement an identity and access management (IAM) program: An effective IAM program would require the IT team to look closely at the different roles and job descriptions in HR’s employee database, figure out which employees need access to what information, and follow the principle of least privilege. For example, a radiologist would never need access to the list of patients for whom prosthetics were fitted.


l 3. Perform comprehensive risk assessments: A risk assessment will help the healthcare institution identify


all valuable data assets, prioritise them, and determine the business impact of a breach for every data asset. Using this information, IT can plug any vulnerabilities.


l 4. Monitor threshold-based alerts: Threshold-based alerting lets security personnel know as soon as certain conditions are met. For example, did someone with a doctor’s user account attempt to log in to a server and fail five consecutive times in one minute? Did this account then gain access on the sixth attempt? This could be a potential brute-force attack.


l 5. Look for anomalies: To better protect against threats, companies need to adopt user behaviour analytics (UBA), which looks at patterns of human behaviour and then applies algorithms to detect meaningful anomalies in those patterns. A UBA engine creates a dynamic baseline based on each user’s activity and will monitor for anomalies. This baseline may be updated every day based on the user’s activity. For example, the chief


of medicine may usually log on to the network between 9am and 6pm, and the system would learn that this is their ‘normal’ behaviour. If this user logs on to the network at 12:30am, it would then be treated as an anomaly and an immediate alert would be sent to security personnel.


What can we expect 10 years from now?


Within the next 10 years, doctors may start using artificial intelligence (AI) in every sphere of their work. AI-assisted robotic surgeries, virtual nursing assistants, and precision medicine might become commonplace. It will also become essential for healthcare institutions to invest in cyber security tools that employ general AI and machine learning to protect against cyber crime. While precision medicine predicts how likely it is for a patient to suffer from a particular ailment based on their genetic information, precision cyber security may predict how likely it is for a hospital to suffer from a data breach.


CSJ


MAY 2019


WWW.CLINICALSERVICESJOURNAL.COM I


35


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