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NEWS


Site Zero in Sweden aims for world-leading status


Swedish Plastic Recycling says it will invest SEK 1bn in a state-of-the-art facility for sorting plastics packaging for recycling which will be built in Motala, Sweden. It claims this will be “the largest and most modern plastic recycling plant in the world”. Called Site Zero, the facility is expected to be completed in 2023. It will sort 200,000 tpa of PP, HDPE, LDPE, PET trays/ bottles, EPS, PS, PVC and two grades of mixed polyolefins.


Swedish Plastic Recycling


already operates a facility on the site but this processes only four types of plastics waste. “We are doubling our capacity and will be able to handle 200,000 tonnes of plastic packaging per year,”


APR’s new ‘Preferred’


program The Association of Plastics Recyclers in the US has started a new program to recognise companies that develop packaging that meet the “APR Preferred” category according to APR’s definition of recyclability outlined in its Design Guide for Plastics Recyclability. It said this ensures good quality recycled plastic is available for brand compa- nies that are committed to using PCR in their products. � https://plasticsrecycling.org


6


and sent for chemical recycling, or reprocessed into new composite prod- ucts. “At Site Zero, zero packaging goes to incinera- tion,” it said. In August, Swedish Plastic


Recycling acquired Motala Business Park, which it said “creates the conditions for future expansions”. Site Zero will be climate


said CEO Mattias Philipsson. “This creates the conditions needed for receiving and eventually recycle all plastic packaging from Swedish households.” Site Zero will have a fully


automated process including 60 near infra-red (NIR) sensors for sorting, approxi- mately 5 km of conveyor


belts, and additionally will have washing and granula- tion in phase two of the project. The number of employees is expected to increase from about 80 currently to 150-200 by 2023. Swedish Plastic Recycling said any plastics waste that remains after the sorting process will be separated


neutral with zero emissions and there are further plans to produce renewable energy by covering the building’s large flat roof with solar panels. The Swedish Environ-


mental Protection Agency is contributing to Site Zero with financing of just over SEK 180m. � www.svenskplasta- tervinning.se


TPEs from scrapped windshields


Avient has added two new additions to its reSound R recycled-content TPE portfolio that contain 25% post-consumer PVB (polyvi- nyl butyral) recovered from the centre layer of broken automotive windshields and laminated architectural glass. The new TPEs originate


from a collaboration between Avient and Shark Solutions, a Danish specialist in sustainable PVB. Both offer 45-55 Shore A hardness and can be overmoulded to PP. They are supplied in a natural grade that can be easily coloured.


PLASTICS RECYCLING WORLD | September 2021 IMAGE: AVIENT The products are aimed


at general consumer applications such as personal care items, lawn and garden tools, golf clubs and footwear. According to Avient, their performance


properties also fit automo- tive applications where vibration damping is needed, such as doormats, door damping and glove boxes. � www.avient.com


www.plasticsrecyclingworld.com


IMAGE: SWEDISH PLASTIC RECYCLING


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