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MACHINERY | MIXERS


has grown in importance and, as a consequence, predicts future development in mixing systems will include predictive maintenance, use of smart components, and support for cloud computing. Zeppelin Systems offers two mixers that are


Left: Zeppelin System’s FM-T High Intensity Mixer features a split mixing bowl to aid cleaning


Custom solutions According to Zeppelin Systems, the current Covid-19 situation has resulted in a number of projects being placed on hold but general demand for mixing systems in the compounding sector has been growing. The German company reports a particularly high level of interest in complex custom-made systems that can be delivered on short lead times. “A wide variety of operations within compounding require mixing solutions,” says Karl-Hendrik Schluckebier, Product Manager Mixing & Treatment Components at the company. “These include chemical modification, dispersion of pigments and mineral powders, compounding, drying, coating, stabilisation, homogenisation, pelletising and agglomeration. Such processes are needed for PVC compounds for pipes, profiles, films, sheets and cables, as well colour and additive masterbatches, pigment concentrates and technical compounds, for example.” Schluckebier identifies a number of factors influencing mixer developments for compounding, including automation, machine availability, optimised material flow, reducing cleaning times, and environmental and sustainability issues. He also says that the pandemic has meant remote access


Schematic representations from Mixaco show the vertical, radial, and horizontal vectors that combine to create the vortex in a container mixer Source: Mixaco


52 COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2020 www.compoundingworld.com


engineered specifically for the mixing needs of the compounding sector — the Container Mixer CMQ (EP 3 342 480 B1) and the High Intensity Mixer FM – T. The company says the CMQ Container Mixer incorporates an innovative mixing principle that can cut up to 80% from normal cleaning time. This is achieved through the use of a flat easy-to-wipe mixing head and mixing tool with a high bottom and wall clearance that prevents material build-up. The company says good mixing is achieved with the wing-profile tool, which due to its low weight makes disassembly for cleaning quicker cleaning. It is also said to ensure a good material vortex, high lifting force, and fast and effective homogenisation is achieved, which results in optimal dispersion characteristics and final colour strength. The machine frame design has no sharp edges, which helps keep the plant clean, while the venting system and container seal guarantees a dust-free working environment. The FM-T High Intensity Mixer is described as a


quick-to-clean flexible stationary. Its design incorporates a two-piece completely jacketed divided mixing bowl configured with a hydraulic unit for lifting the upper bowl part and for lifting and turning the lid. Good access to the inside of the mixer is said to allow easy cleaning and maintenance, without the need for confined space permits (with the US OSHA framework). Germany-based Mixaco manufactures a wide


range of container mixers, following the principle that the sooner the mix is removed from the mixer the quicker the machine is back in operation. The most recent addition to its product line-up is the Container Mixer i4, a highly flexible system that can accommodate a range of container sizes and features a flat mixing head to ensure very fast product cleandowns.





IMAGE: ZEPPELIN SYSTEMS


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