search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ADDITIVES | CARBON BLACK


across multiple markets. “One of the fast growing applications for electrically conductive compounds is EMI shielding, linked mainly to the deployment of 5G technology and vehicle electrification with the adoption of EV and hybrid vehicles, the increased number of sensors and electronic parts on-board vehicles,” the company says. “Thanks to their high conductivity and ease of


Table 1: Chart showing volume resistivity and through-plane thermal conductivity (Laser Flash on injection moulded samples) of Ensaco 250G and C-Therm carbon blacks as a function of additive loading in HDPE Source: Imerys Graphite and Carbon


displace black surface coatings.” Rossin points to Birla Carbon’s high-colour


Raven blacks, which he says are designed for exceptional colour and physical properties. He says they offer high jetness, UV protection and viscosity control. “Raven 2800 Ultra , Raven 2900 Ultra and Raven 3000 Ultra blacks are particularly designed keeping both colour and processability in mind,” he says. “Because of their unique combination of surface area and structure, they are easy to disperse and hence provide excellent jetness. Birla Carbon aims to set the bar even higher by launching a new ultra-high (piano) black product for plastics in 2021.”


Conductive solutions Imerys Graphite & Carbon says its Ensaco and specialty Timrex C-Therm carbon solutions are formulated to confer electrical (and thermal) conductivity to polymers. It also points to the impact of megatrends such as metal replacement and light-weighting, which are causing a steady increase in demand for conductive carbon black


Follow us on...


Be the first to know when we publish a new edition, plus updates on our conferences and useful links.


www.twitter.com/plasticsworld


processing, Ensaco conductive carbon blacks and high aspect ratio Timrex C-Therm are ideal solutions to confer EMI shielding properties to polymers and to achieve high levels of attenuation in combination with other conductive additives such as metal fibres,” it says. “Ensaco is a cutting- edge conductive carbon black, with a winning combination of high purity, high structure and low surface area, which guarantees low moisture pick-up as well as easy dispersion. This unique set of properties enables reaching high levels of conductivity at low loadings and is a key benefit for compound mechanical and flow properties. The high level of graphiticity of Ensaco also makes it a suitable additive to bring thermal conductivity to polymers, especially in applications where high through-plane thermal conductivity is required.” Advances in hybrid (HV) and fully electric vehicle (EV) technology have increased demand for thermoplastic conductive compounds for shielding against electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic interference (RFI/EMI). Both functions are enabled by conductive fillers. Orion Engineered Carbons says it has been focusing on the nature of carbon black conductivity, conductive black application in these applications, and in applications development. “Consumers and our customers require us to move forward with sustainability initiatives,” says Greg Zartman, Orion Marketing Manager, Polymers, Americas. “This work in conductive plastics, on-going efforts to reduce tyre roll resistance, and participation in the BlackCycle


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66