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NEWS


OCSiAl opens graphene nanotube R&D centre


Nanotechnology firm OCSiAl has opened its latest R&D and technical support centre for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in Luxembourg. The facility covers 350m2 and will be targeted at development of elastomers and thermoplastic compos- ites enhanced with SWCNTs (which the company refers to as graphene nanotubes). Key focus areas will include lightweight and smart car bodies and energy efficient tyres. Russia-headquartered OCSiAl has existing R&D facilities in Asia and Eastern Europe. It said the new Luxembourg location “is related to the fact that


Danimer set to go public


US biodegradable polymers manufacturer Danimer has sealed an agreement with Live Oak, a special purpose acquisi- tion company, that will lead to a $210m invest- ment and see it list on the New York Stock Exchange as Danimer Scientific. Danimer CEO Stephen E. Croskrey will remain at the helm.


Danimer owns a


Above: OCSiAl’s Luxembourg centre will accelerate SWCNT developments


Europe is at the forefront of developments in material engineering solutions, including the ongoing auto industry revolution.” OCSiAl currently has an


SWCNT production capacity of around 75 tonnes/yr. It plans to commission a 100 tonnes/yr production unit in Luxembourg in 2023. � www.ocsial.com


Altair buys M-Base Engineering


Altair, a US-based company focused on data analytics and computer-based simulation technologies, has acquired Germany’s M-Base Engineering+Software, which supplies material database and information systems, mainly for the plastics sector. M-Base is the official


software supplier to CAM- PUS (Computer Aided Material Preselection by Uniform Standard), which is the world’s most successful plastic material database. Altair said it will continue to invest in the CAMPUS database in order to ensure consistent, high-quality material data is available to


customers to drive accurate simulation results.


M-Base Engineering+


Software also develops its own Material Data Centre plastics information tool, which combines CAMPUS with other databases and tools to support designers and engineers. � www.altair.com


portfolio of core patents it purchased from Procter & Gamble in 2007. Its best-known product is Nodax PHA, a fully biodegradable and renewable plastic derived from canola oil that carries marine degradable certification. Nodax is currently made on an industrial scale at Danimier’s facility at Winchester, Kentucky, and production there is said to be fully sold out, based on signed and pending contracts. The company said it will use the newly secured capital base to increase production tenfold to about 90,000 tonnes/year by 2025. � www.danimerscientific.com


Recycled PS suitable for food contact use


Styrenics Circular Solutions (SCS) says challenge testing carried out at Fraunhofer Institute in Germany has shown that polystyrene mechanically recycled using “supercleaning” technology developed by Gneuss, also of Germany, is suitable for food


10


contact applications. It said it now plans to make a first application for an opinion from the European Food Safety Authority. SCS, which is a value chain initiative


that aims to increase the circularity of styrenic polymers, said the tests


COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2020


simulated worst-case assumptions by adding impurities to post-consumer PS before recycling it. The results, it said, showed that the high efficiency of the mechanical recycling technology for removal of impurities. � www.styrenics-circular-solutions.com


www.compoundingworld.com


IMAGE: OCSIAL


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