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Risk reduction by cavitation control


As all kinds of stakeholders regarding cavitation-related issues are represented in CRS, cavitation has been a major research topic through the CRS lifetime. The aim was to increase knowledge and provide members with methods to reduce risk by obtaining better control of cavitation.


Erik van Wijngaarden, Johan Bosschers & Do Ligtelijn, e.v.wijngaarden@marin.nl


Observation of full scale cavitation by means of stereo photography (left) and the cavitation thickness distribution derived from that (right)


T 16 report


he early days of CRS had seen a trend of rapidly increasing power per propeller to levels beyond the


experience of ship designers, operators, classification societies and propeller suppliers. With this development, cavitation became a more serious issue as it caused erosion of propeller blades, ship vibrations and noise.


Aspects of cavitation were already studied within the first CRS projects in the seventies, but from the eighties on, extensive research


focused on cavitation alone was carried out. In the first project a knowledge basis was formed. CRS members provided data from hull-pressure fluctuation measurements and cavitation observations on board ships. These included unique measurements of cavitation thickness on full-scale propellers.


Together with an assessment of the then available prediction tools within the CRS membership, the state-of-the-art knowledge on cavitation could be described and


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