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CRS membership, 1969-2019


2000s in projects with appealing names such as ELAST (2002), WHIP (2005, 2009) and WHAM! (2012), connecting dedicated slamming calculation tools with the seakeeping analysis tools PRECAL and PRETTI. Green water and the related impact loads were studied in Green Water Loading (SLGR, 1992).


Propeller cavitation and the resulting erosion effects were studied in CAV (1983), PRES (1996, 2000) and EROSION (2005, 2008). EROSION (2005) and EROSION-2 (2008). Comfort- related phenomena like vibrations and noise were addressed in CAVDISC (2006), Broadband Propeller Noise (BROADBAND, 2009), sequelled by Broadband Noise and Vibrations (BROADBAND-2, 2014) and Onboard Noise and Vibrations (ONBOARD, 2017). The development of a panel code for pressure calculations was taken on in PROCAL (2002, 2006) and continued in PROPDEV (2009), PROPLOADS (2011) and extended to ducted propellers in PRODUCT (2012, 2015). The introduction of podded propulsors was accompanied by a series of projects: POD (2000, 2002) and Loads on Pods (LOP, 2006). Operations in arctic environments, including loads on propellers, were studied in PROPOLAR (2010).


Unfortunately, the era 1969-2019 witnessed many maritime disasters involving a large number of casualties, such as the capsizing of the Herald of Free Enterprise (1987) and the


14 report


sinking of the Estonia (1994). These tragic events focused attention on the survivability of damaged ships. In CRS, this was reflected in projects such as Ultimate Stability (US, 1984), Damage Stability (DAMA, 1997) and Ship Survivability (SHIPSURV, 2003, 2009) which aimed at a ship survivability assessment procedure and the development of a simulation tool for progressive internal flooding.


Special design concepts were studied, shedding light on their powering, seakeeping and manoeuvring characteristics: Fast Ships (FAST, 1990), Catamaran Design (CAT, 1995), Fast Monohulls (MONOFAST, 2002) and Trimaran Design (TRIMAR, 2008). These projects provided a unique opportunity to validate the software tools developed in other projects using dedicated experiments.


The importance of high quality data from full scale measurements for validation and other purposes was recognised, which led to the Full Scale Monitoring project (FSM, 1992), followed by Ship Monitoring and Comparative Studies (SMACS, 1998).


2010s: new challenges, new techniques Meanwhile, the impact of shipping on the environment, both local and global, had become a growing concern in the maritime community. In 2011, the IMO made the Energy Efficiency


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