search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
THOUGHT LEADER


as large as normal. And only half of those students will be physically present. So, teachers will be able to instruct both live and Zoom students simultaneously. Because the Zoom students do not have to socially distance, only the handful of students physically present must space themselves far enough apart in a conventional classroom even indoors. Plus, every teacher will have a teacher’s aide (for important reasons noted below). The math works. But teachers, aides, drivers and other non-students—all older—must dress practically like as- tronauts. And students must mask up, space themselves apart and undergo a level of sustained discipline they have never experienced. In this model, half the students can travel to physical school either Monday, Wednesday and Friday or Tues- day, Thursday and Saturday. Or they can travel Monday through Wednesday, or Thursday through Saturday – the two simplest variations. The latter variation should provide more flexibility to working parents—assuming their employers make reasonable adjustments. To keep costs under control and stuck with a bus fleet that cannot realistically expand, the transportation community must deliver service to its schools in three “tiers,” as efficiently as reasonably possible. Because the number of students transported on any run will be one- fourth the normal number (less for those buses not filled to capacity during the old normal), the “morning ses- sion” school hours would look something like this:


• High School: • Middle School:


• Elementary School:


6 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. 7 a.m. to noon 8 to 11:00 a.m.


The afternoon session’s hours would resemble this pattern:


• High School: • Middle School:


• Elementary School:


1:15 to 8 p.m. 2 to 7 p.m. 3 to 6 p.m.


Within this structure, time will be needed to provide the trips in each tier, and to deadhead from the end of one tier to the beginning of the next one. And some time will be needed from the last high school drop-off of the morning session for the driver to deadhead to the first high school pick-up of the afternoon session. This schedule will be exhausting for high school teachers, even though there are ways to shorten their school days—likely to 60 hours a week (see discussion below). But we will need two shifts of school bus drivers: The safety risks of an 80-hour week is unacceptable, if not outright illegal under state and federal laws and regulations.


48 School Transportation News • OCTOBER 2020


Fortunately, the five-month implementation period


will provide ample time to recruit, hire and train these additional drivers. Our extraordinary current national unemployment rate will make their engagement as full- time drivers possible, even at the low wages they had been earning, mostly as part-time drivers, during our industry’s decades-long drivers’ shortage. And these five months will give us more time to acquire the number of testing kits, processing chemicals and skills needed to conduct the tests, and to obtain the results quickly enough to render the results valuable, and thus sustain the success of this model. A number of factors may cushion the impacts of this


model for high school teachers. For example, teachers’ aides could conduct physical education and “home room” during the first two classes of the morning ses- sion, and study hall and physical education during the last two classes of the afternoon session – shortening the otherwise 14-hour school day to 10 ½ hours. Teach- ers could grab a short nap between the two sessions. And teachers’ aides could grade most tests, enforce discipline, communicate with parents, and conduct many administrative tasks. Certain types of teachers’ aides—particularly highly-skilled computer profession- als—could actually teach occasional classes, or part of them. Occasional relief could be provided by substitute teachers –better still if provided by experienced retired teachers. It may be possible to reduce the high school teacher’s work week to close to 50 hours. Most impor- tantly, class size will be half of normal (with only half of the students physically present at any given time). Many teachers have low opinions of traditional teach- ers’ aides. But our enormous unemployment rate could improve their quality significantly. These roughly 3.2 million additional positions could include a valuable array of skills, including computer assistance to both students and teachers, and “second language assistance.” These aides could provide additional help to students falling behind—including “after-school” tutoring. Their presence should also help “close the gap” between the best (or most privileged) and worst (or least privileged) students. With the flexibility of rotating classes and aides at the middle and high school levels, these benefits would be even greater. Certain spatial adjustments could also decrease ti-


er-oriented travel times and decrease the length of the school day (as well as drivers’ shifts and mileage-relat- ed costs). While it is unrealistic to change the location of schools, this would be less of a constraint now as most classes would be held outdoors. Further, and most importantly, the storage locations of the buses could be relocated, greatly lowering operating and maintenance


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62