search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SPECIAL REPORT


COVID-19 Era Introduces New Student Behavior Concerns


Might mask-shaming and public ridicule over temperatures taken at the school bus stop result in a new era of bullying?


Written By Margaret Johnson B


ullying has been a part of childhood (and adulthood) since the beginning of recorded human history and, likely, even before humans began documenting it. Every war since the


beginning of time is a testament to that. Unfortunately, bullying has been and remains human nature, whether it is based on politics or the result of childish dust-up on the local playground. “At its core, bullying is a harmful behavioral expression


of potentially multiple emotional drives: fear, insecurity, anger, and even sadness—emotions that the bully has not developed helpful behaviors to express,” said Adam Saénz, Ph.D., a school psychologist and CEO of the Applied EQ Group. According to the report “Indicators of School Crime and Safety” prepared for the U.S. Department of Educa- tion, 20 percent of students ages 12 through 18 reported being bullied at school in 2017. But from 2005 through 2017, the percentage of students who reported being bullied at school at least once a week decreased from 29 to 20 percent. Approximately eight percent of those sur- veyed reported the bullying behavior they experienced occurred on a school bus. While bullying may appear to be on the decline, it con-


tinues to cause anxiety for parents, school officials, and student transporters across the country. The Department of Education study, which was most recently updated in


22 School Transportation News • OCTOBER 2020


July, asks students ages 12 through 18 if they had been subjected to bullying related to a specific characteristic or topic. In 2017, about 42 percent of students who re- ported being bullied at school indicated that the bullying was related to at least one of the following characteris- tics: physical appearance (30 percent), race (10 percent), gender (8 percent), disability (7 percent), ethnicity (7 percent), religion (5 percent), and sexual orientation (4 percent). Now, it appears a new bullying angle could be on the


horizon: the new novel coronavirus. With its advent this year, bullies may have a new topic to add to their repertoire. As of this writing, many schools remained in a vir-


tual learning model due to the continued spread of the virus and on-going quarantines in many communities. However, transportation of students with disabilities continue, and some school districts have fully opened. Still, there are relatively few buses on the road than there would be normally. It has yet to be determined whether COVID-19 and the health safety behaviors required to go out in public (mask wearing, hand washing, temperature taking, etc.) will become part of the bullying landscape. But it seems likely given their current prevalence. “The broad aim of bullying is to exert power over or to


inflict pain upon another individual,” shared Alexandra Robinson, an industry consultant who also served as president of the National Association for Pupil Transpor-


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62