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pay for multiple types of mobility services (taxis, buses, trains, scooters, bikes, etc.). The concept describes a shift away from personally owned modes of transportation and toward mobility provided as a service. Because of the pandemic and the need to maintain distance, there may be a shift away from school buses, too. So to prepare for the future, PTaaS would contemplate the concept of going beyond the school bus to incorporate public and private modes, a variety of vehicles, through one or more data platforms with seamless integration and security. The school bus as we know it may be a thing of the past. These vehicles are efficient at moving large numbers of people, but the close proximity could be too efficient at transmitting the virus. In a future where social distanc- ing dominates, smaller vehicles may be necessary to get students from point A to point B safely. This could mean bringing in other types of transportation, such as taxis, for- hire services, and transportation network companies. Once student transportation providers are able to tap into such a network, they will be positioned to use their vehicles for other purposes when they are not transporting students. Importantly, with all of the technology that student trans-


portation providers have amassed to prevent spreading COVID-19, the benefit of enhanced routing, communica- tion and related software could very well help governments


respond to other emergencies, such as hurricanes and earthquakes. PTaaS could also allow for integration to pub- lic transportation and other private transport networks to create more options for students to get to and from school safely and efficiently, with economic benefits for school districts, transport providers and families. ●


Matthew W. Daus is a partner with Windel Marx and chairman of the law firm’s transportation practice group. He is also the president of the International Association of Transportation Regulators and is the Transportation Technology chair for the City University


of New York, Transportation Research Center at The City College of New York. He may be contacted at mdaus@windelsmarx.com.


1) https://stnonline.com/go/7v 2) See 20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99. 3) See https://stnonline.com/go/7w 4) See 15 U.S.C. §§ 6501–6506. 5) See 45 CFR 160.103. The HIPAA rules define covered entities as (1) health plans, (2) health care clearinghouses, and (3) health care providers that electronically transmit any health information in connection with transactions for which U.S. Health and Human Services has adopted standards. 6) The HIPAA Privacy Rule permits a covered entity to disclose personal health information in similar circumstances. (45 CFR § 164.512(j)(1)(i).) 7) 20 U.S.C. § 1232g(b)(1)(I); 34 CFR §§ 99.31(a)(10) and 99.36. 8) https://stnonline.com/go/7x 9) Gonzaga University v. Doe, 536 U.S. 273 (2002)


New HEPA-6 Filtration Unit


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26 School Transportation News • NOVEMBER 2020


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