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Houston County Schools in Georgia operates both CNG (left) and propane (right) school buses.


Mark Childers, powertrain and technology sales man-


ager at Thomas Built Buses called CNG “probably the cleanest fossil fuel that you can burn.” “It also gives a more diesel-like performance in the vehi-


cle,” he continued. “The challenge of putting in CNG is the expensive infrastructure needed. A typical fast-fill CNG sta- tion can run about $1 million dollars, while a slow-fill station is about half that.” As previously reported in STN, Tom Walmer, the di-


rector of transportation for the Houston County School District near Atlanta, said his decision to embrace natu-


ral gas school buses was made easier with the availability of a fueling station in nearby Perry, Georgia, which was erected primarily to serve Frito Lay’s tractor-trailers.


Affordable Options for Natural Gas According to Hanstedt, many states are helping fleets


transition to natural gas by offering grant programs for infrastructure and vehicles. “We’ve worked with school districts and other entities


to build and upgrade stations using 100-percent of our own capital,” Hanstedt said. We’ll design, operate and


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