search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MATHEMATICS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE


FLIPPING THE SCRIPT ON FINANCIAL LITERACY BY DAVID STOCKER


T


he new mathematics cur- riculum guide dropped this September. Like much of what the Ford Conser- vatives have done over the course of this year, intro-


ducing a new curriculum while educators are learning to teach in a pandemic is ill- planned and ill-conceived. Nevertheless, I must say that I am excited


by a new strand of “back to basics” learning: financial literacy. The reason I’m so optimistic is that at the very heart of teaching mathemat- ics for social justice is the understanding that we are all inextricably linked to one another through economic relationships. There can be nothing more basic than learning to tease apart these relationships to demonstrate that people’s political, economic and social experi- ences hinge on a complex tapestry of financial policies and interactions. In the mathematics classroom, if we can


make these interactions visible, we set the stage not only for rich, complex mathematics skill development, but also for direct action to make the world a better place. If you’re new to teaching mathematics for


social justice, a seasoned pro or somewhere along the journey, I’ve pulled together a few


24 ETFO VOICE | WINTER 2020


possible directions for the upcoming finan- cial literacy expectations.


F1.2 Identify and describe vari- ous reliable sources of information that can help with planning for and reaching a financial goal.


The Fraser Institute is a Canadian think tank with a great motto – If It Matters, Measure It. But here’s the thing. Measurement is in- evitably a political process; we come to dif- ferent conclusions depending on if and what we choose to measure and how we choose to measure it. The Fraser Institute is considered a conservative, libertarian organization, so it would fit nicely in a critical mathematics classroom when looking at the financial im- plications of their reports and recommenda- tions. When looking for “reliable” sources of information, teaching students to expose an organization’s funding sources can put the conclusions they come to into perspective. If, for example, the Fraser Institute accepts hundreds of thousands of dollars from the business community, we could ask whether their financial advice happens to benefit… that business community. If we’re looking for a different perspec- tive though, we might look at the Canadian


Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Alternative Federal Budget. Here is how the CCPA de- scribes this project:


“The Alternative Federal Budget is a ‘what if’ exercise – what a government could do if it were truly committed to an economic, social, and environmental agenda that reflects the values of the large majority of Canadians – as opposed to the interests of a privileged minor- ity. It demonstrates in a concrete and compel- ling way that another world really is possible.”


As we plan for more fair and just com-


munities, especially throughout and in the wake of COVID-19, reliable sources of in- formation will be essential, especially when it comes to understanding the financials be- hind our goal setting.


F1.3 Create, track and adjust sample budgets designed to meet longer- term financial goals.


One source of inspiration students can use when making their own budget is their city budget. In Toronto, as elsewhere, prop- erty taxes fuel municipal services. Taking a close look at where and in what proportions that money is spent is central to any fight for social justice.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52