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EDITORS VOICE


Editorial Editor Sarah Robinson sarah@opusbm.co.uk


Editor Ryan Lloyd ryan@opusbm.co.uk


Advertising Account Manager Paul Turner paul@opusbm.co.uk


Production Production Director Hannah Wilkinson hannah@opusbm.co.uk


Designer Daniel Etheridge daniel@opusbm.co.uk


Designer Nigel Rice nigel@opusbm.co.uk


CEO Mark Hanson mark@opusbm.co.uk


www.tomorrowshs.com


E: info@opusbusinessmedia.co.uk T: 01625 426054 Opus Business Media Ltd


Hello and welcome to the November/December issue of Tomorrow’s Health and Safety.


With England now in the mist of a second lockdown, Scotland introducing a broader five tier-based system and Wales emerging from its lockdown at the beginning of the month, the UK is now tackling the pandemic through the powers of devolved administrations.


http://www.tomorrowshs.com/health-and-safety-news/new-safety-and-health-competency-framework-to-improve-standards


On one hand, it could be argued this is the correct approach, with each of the devolved governments tackling the herculean task of keeping the virus in check in a way that suits the people of their country. On the other hand, it means the United Kingdom is no longer united and the sense of camaraderie and ‘we’re all in this together’ spirit that epitomised the first lockdown is fading as fast as the chances of Boris Johnson making it to the next election as leader of the Conservative Party.


There are some positive developments to be taken from the year. At the beginning of November, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) released its annual injury and ill-health statistics for Great Britain, showing the country is still one of the safest places in the world to work, with the lowest number of deaths on record. In the 2019/2020, there were 111 fatal injuries at work, with 1.6 million people suffering from work-related illness and 693,000 cases of workers sustaining a non-fatal injury. Something all health and safety managers must take note of though, is the startling statistic that more than half of the 38.8 million working days lost due to work related illness were due to mental ill-health.


It’s clear then, that beyond the COVID-19 crisis there is still much work to be done in other key areas, and with an inability to see how long the pandemic will actually last, a more holistic approach for 2021 should be top of the agenda.


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ISSN: 2055-4737


This publication is copyright Opus Business Media Ltd and may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form in whole or in part without the prior written permission of Opus Business Media Ltd. While every care has been taken during the preparation of this magazine, Opus Business Media Ltd cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein or for any consequence arising from it. The publisher does not necessarily agree with the views and opinions expressed by contributors.


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On behalf of the Tomorrow’s Health & Safety team, we wish you all the best over the coming months, and hope you have a relaxing – and safe – seasonal break.


EDITOR’S VOICE


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @TOMORROWSHS Ryan Lloyd, Editor


Sarah Robinson, Editor www.tomorrowshs.com


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