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NEWS


WORKERS INJURED IN FORKLIFT TRUCK CRASH SEES FIRM IN COURT


A carpet sample book manufacturer has been fined after two workers were seriously injured in an incident where a forklift truck crashed into an onsite refuse skip.


Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard how on 29 July 2019, three workers at Profile Patterns Limited had been emptying waste from plastic bins at their site in Wigan. They were using a forklift truck to raise the bins to a height that enabled a worker at either side of the truck to manually tip the bins into a skip.


When one of the bins became trapped between the side of the skip and the forks, the driver of the forklift truck climbed on top of the skip to free the bin whilst the other two employees remained standing at either side of the forklift truck. Another employee was asked to reverse the forklift truck to aid the release of the bin.


However, after reversing, the forklift truck then moved forward crashing into the skip causing the employee on top of the skip to fall. One of the workers standing at the side of the truck became impaled by her right arm by the fork. The two workers sustained serious fractures that required hospital treatment.


An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Profile Patterns Limited did not take effective measures to ensure the health and safety of employees in relation to the risks arising from the use and operation of forklift trucks. The company failed to implement a safe system of work and provide adequate instruction and training to employees. It was established that tipping bins into the skip in this way was normal working practice that had taken place over a considerable length of time, throughout which employees were placed at significant risk.


Profile Patterns Limited of Makerfield Way, Ince Wigan, Lancashire, pleaded guilty to breaching sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The company was fined £20,000 and ordered to pay costs of £4,435.


LANDLORD SENTENCED FOLLOWING GAS CONCERNS AT RENTAL PROPERTY


A landlord has been fined for failing to maintain gas appliances at a rental property in accordance with the law.


Swansea Magistrates’ Court heard that between 3 May 2017 and 28 June 2017 inspectors from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Gas Safe Register inspected a property at Penlan, Swansea. They found a gas cooker which was not to current standards, a boiler which was found to be a risk which may constitute a danger to life, and installation pipework considered to be immediately dangerous, exposing the tenant and others to potentially fatal exposure to carbon monoxide.


A HSE investigation found that the landlord, Mr Tariq Shehadeh, failed in his duty to have the gas appliances regularly inspected or maintained, and failed to provide a Landlord Gas Safety Record, all


of which are legal requirements. Mr Shehadeh later complied with Improvement Notices which required he take action to deal with these issues.


Mr Tariq Shehadeh of Abu Hamour, Doha, Qatar pleaded guilty to breaching Regulations 28, 36(2), 36(3) and 36(4) of the Gas Safety (Installation & Use) Regulations 1998. He has been given a 12-month custodial sentence, suspended for two years and ordered to pay the full costs of £14,883.30.


HSE Inspector, Anne Marie Orrells, said after the hearing: “Landlords must ensure gas appliances at their tenanted properties are checked by a Gas Safe Register engineer at least every 12 months and are maintained in a safe condition.


“HSE will not hesitate to take appropriate enforcement action against those that fall below the required standards.”


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