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Standards and Methods for Environmental Monitoring in the UK


Dave Curtis, STA Administrator


Each year in the Annual Guide we highlight what has taken place in the world of standards development. Standard reference methods are essential for the effective measurement and control of air pollution. Such standards are developed at National, European and world-wide level. The robustness and fi tness for purpose of these standards is a function of the accumulated expertise and experience of the people who work together in committee to produce them. Where internationally- derived standards are binding on the UK, as European (CEN) standards are, it is particularly important that they should recognise UK interests and sensitivities. BSI manages the UK input to new standards via its technical committees and the UK experts that they nominate to CEN and ISO working groups.


Standards are developed in Europe by Comité European de Normalisation (CEN) and internationally by International Standardisation Organisation (ISO)


European Standards (ENs) are based on a consensus, which refl ects the economic and social interests of 33 CEN Member countries channelled through their National Standardization Organizations. Most standards are initiated by industry. Other standardization projects can come from consumers, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) or associations, or even European legislators.


ISO International Standards ensure that products and services are safe, reliable and of good quality. For business, they are strategic tools that reduce costs by minimizing waste and errors, and increasing productivity. They help companies to access new markets, level the playing fi eld for developing countries and facilitate free and fair global trade.


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