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M


oving to a new home is meant to be one of the most stressful of times – next to a death in the family, and divorce. Salma Khan


faced all three in a short space of time. Throw in a pandemic and the ensuing lockdowns, and you have all the ingredients of a catastrophe. But Salma is now ready to start a new life with her young son in a newly renovated listed building by the beach in West Cornwall.


The original Roundhouse in Crantock dates back


more than 250 years. It has been through countless uses from tearoom to art gallery, but its history isn’t the only confusing element: the configuration of the main building and the additions that followed is an


enduring mystery. Originally a row of separate buildings and outbuildings, the Roundhouse site incorporates 18th century smelters, a cottage and a series of joined up farm outbuildings – including a tack room and piggery – dating back to around 1850. Its various uses also included a broccoli packing site, before being converted into use as an art gallery, craft store and church tea room. But by the time Salma bought the property it had gone unchanged for 40 years – and was in definitely need of major renovations to make it a family home, which would see the interiors gutted. “The house consists of the outbuildings, an old cottage, and the Roundhouse itself,” explains


jul/aug 2021


www.sbhonline.co.uk


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