search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS


5


© Kilian O Sullivan EDUCATION


Bell Phillips completes contemporary grammar school extension in Kent


Bell Phillips Architects have completed a major new extension to The Skinners’ School in Tunbridge Wells, Kent – the practice’s first completed education building.


Arranged over three floors, the 1,187 m² new building responds to expanding pupil numbers, housing a sixth form centre, English department and library. The design has been developed from a “careful analysis of adjacent Gothic revival buildings to produce an architecture that is both highly contemporary and respectful of its historic context at this prestigious school,” said the architects.


Established in 1887, the site evolved over time into a campus made up of a series of individual, un-linked buildings. A number of the later additions “failed to match the striking composition of the original pair,” said the architects. To reintroduce architectural integrity across the site and form a legible whole, Bell Phillips have added an element that “deftly responds to the existing context alongside


broader improvements to the site’s landscaping strategy.”


The ground floor layout helps to “tie the new building into the existing spatial arrangement and most importantly the school’s Upper Yard,” which is an “important social and recreational space.” An essential part of the brief was to ensure the Yard continued to function as a social hub, as such Bell Phillips’ new addition “reimagines it as both a point of arrival and place of transition.”


The ground floor is occupied by a sixth form centre which provides “variety and flexibility”: quieter, more intimate study spaces are kept separated from more informal study spaces – directly linked to a breakout area. The first floor contains the English department, and the library is located within the tall pitched roof volume on the top floor, lined with timber and forming a light and spacious learning environment. At all scales the facades “draw on motifs and architectural conventions


from the existing Victorian buildings to forge a contemporary architectural language and create a clear visual interdependence,” said the architects. The “dominance of vertical proportions and strongly articulated gable ends” reflects the approach on the Main School building. Details such as window jambs and soldier courses respond to the existing features.


The new building includes a “high- specification built envelope,” including solar control measures and good daylight infiltration to reduce reliance on artificial lighting. A high efficiency HVAC plant system exceeds Part L requirements and works in tandem with an array of roof mounted photovoltaics. Headmaster, Edward Wesson said: “The learning spaces create through their design an atmosphere, visual impact and sound quality that encourages calm academic purpose. In that sense, in a boys’ grammar school, it has the potential to be transformative.”


ADF MAY 2021 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84