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14 INSIGHTS


SITE LINES Finding the perfect blend


Co-located developments, an emerging trend, could help solve industry challenges by satisfying demand for both industrial and residential developments at a stroke. Peter Watkins of HDR | Bradbrook Consulting looks at the inherent design challenges


A


co-location can best be described as a mixed-development model, where new homes lie in close proximity to other classes of use, such as light industrial, retail or offices. There are certain design and engineering challenges around the integration of the different typologies, particularly in London. Firstly, there is the issue of the demand for housing and industrial space. With limited land availability in London and the growth of e-commerce over the past five years, industrial developers are competing with residential developers for land. As the need for housing and industrial space in cities grows,


we’re starting to see the two sectors come together to explore opportunities to co-exist and operate harmoniously. The boom in demand for industrial floor space is being fuelled primarily by evolving consumer behaviour. There is also an increasing demand for last-mile logistics, with retail being driven by e-commerce. Landowners in London are considering the consolidation of assets to maximise land value, exploring the viability of co-located developments with multiple uses, either by refurbishment to free up lettable area, or demolition in part or whole to accommodate other uses. The population in London has grown by 7.5 per cent in the


London Wall © MAKE architects


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ADF MAY 2021


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