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in frequency of use? Conventional products have parts that wear more easily, resulting in leaks, wastage and more frequent repairs. And even the most durable mechanisms require maintenance when used intensively. Specifying durable, reliable products that are easy to maintain will guarantee a longer product life for the tap or soap/gel dispenser.


Technical solutions for sustainable hygiene For ecological reasons, we should minimise over-consumption of water. Compared to traditional basin taps, self-closing mechanical or electronic taps can optimise water usage. They can minimise the water bill without sacrificing user comfort. The valve closes automatically after seconds (mechanical models) or after removing hands from the detection zone (sensor- controlled models), and the flow rate is limited. The user can therefore wet their hands, apply the soap and rinse without the tap running continuously.


Specifiers can prevent water stagnation and avoid bacterial development by choosing electronic taps with a pre-programmed duty flush. An automatic


rinse activates every 24 hours after the last use, running for 60 seconds. A piston- operated solenoid valve (rather than one with a rubber membrane – behind which a small amount of standing water always remains) is an additional advantage in the fight against bacterial growth. For optimal hand hygiene, soap and gel dispensers should be reliable and easy to operate. The push-button on mechanically- operated dispensers must withstand intensive use and regular cleaning and disinfection routines. However, electronic soap dispensers provide the hands-free solution for maximum hygiene. Hygiene is likely to remain firmly on the public health agenda. Washing hands is an essential weapon in the fight against the spread of germs and bacteria. Those who specify sanitary facilities in the education sector must provide hygienic, water-saving and reliable solutions for students and teachers. By understanding the risks and specifying products designed to address these challenges, the risk of contamination can be easily overcome.


Carole Armstrong is marketing and communications manager at Delabie


ADF NOVEMBER 2020


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