search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HARRIS ACADEMY, SUTTON


19


The 10,625 m2


school is


heated by just one domestic-scale boiler feeding small radiators


the London Cancer Hub. Community access to facilities was anticipated around the sports and hall spaces, located on the lower and upper ground levels at the south end of the site.


Materials matter


In line with Passivhaus standards, the architects carefully considered their choice of materials, Dimbleby explains: “We employed a natural colour and material palette, including copper and timber, so the large form would sit sensitively in its suburban environment.” According to Andrew Thornhill, of landscape architects Churchman Thornhill Finch, the key to balancing the building with its surroundings “was ensuring the mass of the school was central to the site and that the storey height dropped to the edges to meet the suburban context.” Brick is used on the ground floor plinth, adjoining external retaining and blade walls, speaking to the predominantly brick houses surrounding the site. Thornhill continues: “Planted terraces to the north further


softened the elevation where overlooking was most direct.”


Materials also play an active role in communicating the function of the scheme and its parts, with copper signalling the community access spaces such as the sports hall and assembly hall, but also nodding to the building’s scientific roots. Timber cladding was used for its low carbon properties, in addition to the aesthetic that it would provide; lighting up the large mass, without imposing on students or neighbouring properties. “We used robust triple glazed timber-aluminium composite windows and included timber extensively internally, bringing the outside inside,” says Dimbleby. He continues: “We used a concrete ground floor with Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels above, and a flexible glulam frame.” With circular economy principles in mind, the structure was designed so that, at the end of the school’s minimum 60-year life span, the frame can be dismantled and reused. CLT floor and roof slabs support the upper levels and roof while endowing the classrooms with greater flexibility; none of the internal walls are supporting, so classrooms can be expanded and contracted as needed.


A labour of learning


Architype worked with educational experts Lloyd Wilson Partnership to develop


ADF NOVEMBER 2020 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36