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ADVOCACY SPOTLIGHT


CMS finalized this policy in the final rule for calendar year 2019 payments to ASCs.


In 2019, ASCA joined Voices for Non-Opioid Choices (Voices), a non- partisan coalition dedicated to pre- venting opioid addiction before it starts by increasing patient access to non-opioid therapies and approaches to managing acute pain. Voices supported the introduction


of the Non-Opioids Prevent Addic- tion in the Nation (NOPAIN) Act, H.R. 5172. If enacted, this legisla- tion would require the HHS secretary to consider separate reimbursement for drugs and devices that help cur- tail post-operative opioid use in both ASCs and hospital outpatient depart-


ments (HOPD). In addition, this leg- islation would require CMS to pro- vide a report to Congress detailing similar barriers that might exist in Medicare for therapeutic approaches to acute pain. This legislation is necessary because current Medicare payment policies can


be strengthened to ensure equal access to non-opioid pain management options in the surgical setting. Non- opioid treatments and therapies can be successful in replacing, delaying or reducing the use of opioids to treat post-surgical pain. Coalition members believe that Congress needs to advance policies that remove disincentives for practitioners to provide patients with non-addictive treatments for periop- erative pain. Last December, to help build support for the bill among law- makers, Voices held a fly-in event on Capitol Hill.


Steve Selde is ASCA’s assistant director of government and legislative affairs. Write him at sselde@ascassociation.org.


ASC FOCUS MARCH 2020| ascfocus.org


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