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hollywood


by tim parks THE OSCAR


COULDS AND SHOULDS W


hen it comes to predicting the outcome of the Academy Awards, there are a few key factors to bear in mind. Chief among them is paying attention to who wins at other award show ceremonies. While not an always full proof


gauge given the sometimes surprise wins at the Oscars, it’s still a sometimes-accurate bellwether of who will take home the gold statue. Then there is the “Oscar Darling” component of those who could read the phone


book, or rather, the contact list in their cellphones nowadays and be awarded for it. Finally, there is who you are rooting for in the hopes that glory will be bestowed upon them. Alright, let’s take a gander at the coulds and shoulds who have the potential to


emerge triumphant during the Oscars telecast on Sunday, February 9. Oh, and there are also some fun facts – because who doesn’t love fun facts?


ACTING UP Since I’m a gentleman – who just said I wasn’t? I’ll get you! – we will start with the women vying in the Best


Actress category. Something problematic in the past for the Oscars is the lack of diversity. While it has gotten better in recent years, they seem to have sadly reverted to that modus operandi with only Cynthia Erivo being recognized for her portrayal of Harriet Tubman in Harriet. Other thespians – which is not a theatrical term for theatre lesbians – who played real-life people are Charl-


ize Theron as Megyn Kelly in Bombshell and Renée Zellweger for her heartbreaking turn as Judy Garland in Judy. Rounding out the pack are Saoirse Ronan in Little Women and Scarlett Johansson in Marriage Story.


FUN FACT: Scarjo is a double nominee and is up for Best Supporting Actress for her work in Jojo Rabbit.


Additionally, Erivo received a second nomination in the Best Original Song category. COULD: Renée Zellweger gave a bravado performance in Judy, including doing her own singing, and was


recognized for the double threat feat at the Golden Globes. SHOULD: See above and if you didn’t shed a tear during her rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,”


you are dead inside! As for the leading men, we have Antonio Banderas playing a version of Pain and Glory director Pedro


Almodovar, Leonardo DiCaprio as a washed-up actor in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Adam Driver dealing with a custody battle in Marriage Story, Jonathan Pryce as Pope Francis in The Two Popes and Joaquin Phoenix as the Joker.


FUN FACT: Fellow nominees Banderas and Pryce starred alongside Madonna in 1996’s Evita. But you


probably knew that, being a homosexual and all. An added fun fact is if Phoenix does win, it will be the second time an Oscar has been awarded to an actor for playing the same character, following Heath Ledger’s posthumous Best Supporting Actor win for The Dark Knight in 2009. COULD: Of DiCaprio’s seven career nominations, only one yielded him the little naked gold man for The


Revenant. So perhaps Academy voters may feel a pang of guilt and throw him another Oscar bone. SHOULD: Phoenix already nabbed a Best Actor trophy, courtesy of the Hollywood Foreign Press at the


Golden Globes, and for good reason. His take on Batman’s arch nemesis was as disturbing as his acceptance speech at the Globes. Seriously, dub tee eff was he talking about?


30 RAGE monthly | February 2020


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