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JEWELLERY FORMING, PLANNISHING & ROLLING MILLS


• This innovative riveting system is intended to pierce and set semi-tubular rivets


• Semi-tubular rivets have a hard head that creates a finished look, and a tubular end that is set by a flaring method to create a secure, clean, and constant connection


• The tool features a piercing tool on one end that creates the hole to accommodate the rivet. The other end is a flaring tool which precisely and cleanly sets the rivet


• No need for a hammer, brilliant for delicate work • Piercing can also be used to create perfect spherical holes for threading (for pendants/decorations)


• The tool is machined from heat treated tool steel, unlike many hand tools on the market which are made from softer metals and then case hardened


• This is what gives our tool the strength and precision to perform as well as it does, allowing you to easily pierce through material up to 2mm


• Used for metal sheet .22 gauge and under • Can be used on sheet metal, leather etc.


Dimensions: • 75 x 40 x 10mm • Hole piercing diameter: Ø1.50mm • Maximum sheet depth: 25mm • Largest size rivet: Ø2.90mm • 125g


Code R37130 Description Riveting & Piercing Tool


UOM Price EACH


£6.75


• Stake holder mounted on wooden board • Cast iron stake holder • With integrated bench clamp • Fits our forming stakes


Spoon Stake


Spoon Stake (For Making Spoons)


Designing and making handmade spoons is one of the most ancient art forms a silversmith/jewellery artist has performed for many century’s.


Spoons are suitable for many occasions and customers will often present them for special occasions such as christenings, shooting spoons, apostle as well as your basic tea, coffee or soup spoon.


If you have ever wanted to make spoons with your own designs, take a look at our singular or set of spoon stakes.


Set of 4 Spoon Stakes with Wooden Stand


• Convex (Double) Stake • For forming & raising • Forged stainless steel • Mirror polished surface


• Beak Stake • For forming & raising • Forged stainless steel • Mirror polished surface


Dimensions: • 85 x 85mm (overall height x overall width)


Code A49682


Description Beak Stake


UOM Price EACH £14.95


Convex (Double) Stake, Deep


Dimensions: • 80 x 80mm (overall height x overall width)


Code A49677 Description Double Convex Stake


UOM Price EACH £14.95


Dimensions: • Stake holding hole 10 x 7mm • Max clamp opening 60mm • 190 x 80mm (overall height x overall width)


Code A49687 Description


Stake Holding Vice with Bench Clamp


Beak Stake UOM Price EACH £13.95


• Cone Forming Stake • For forming & raising • Forged stainless steel • Mirror polished surface


Dimensions: • 85 x 85mm (overall height x overall width)


Code A49683 Description Cone Forming Stake Convex (Double) Stake


UOM Price EACH £14.95


Stakes (Metal Forming) Stake Holder with Bench Clamp Cone Forming Stake


JEWELLERY FORMING, PLANNISHING &ROLLINGMILLS


Sizes of top surface: • Small 32mm x 23mm x 8mm • Medium 39mm x 26mm x 11mm • Large 50mm x 33mm x 11mm • Extra large 65mm x 40mm x 13mm


Weight : 700grams Code


S34922 Description


Set of 4 Spoon Stakes with Wooden Stand


UOM PACK*4 Price £9.95


• Convex (Double) Stake, Deep • For forming & raising • Forged stainless steel • Mirror polished surface


www.COUSINS .COM 869


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