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DRILLS • Mops: Cotton End, Loose Fold, Dolly, Stitched


Ideals for Use: • Final finish on embellishments, brass, in clock refurbishment.


• Polishing and restoring alloy wheels, car bumpers, handle parts for automobiles and bikes.


• Repairing and restoring antique furniture fittings. • Polishing and brightening bathroom and kitchen fittings like brass and steel.


• Get those old pots and pans & cultery looking new • Polish brass plaques to new. • Brighten up old brass, bronze, pewter ornaments, trays, plaques, fire place grills, figurines and statues.


• Restore and make a old steel/brass staircases to look like new.


• Clean up iron garden gates, fences, grills, etc.


If you find the Flexible Drive Shaft too large for some applications view rotary drills for finer work.


Please note: • Always wear eye protection. • When fitting the mandrel in the collet, leave 15mm of mandrel from the collet to the mounted bit for ultimate performance.


Features: • Overall length 1.1mm (44”) • 6mm ( ¼”) keyless chuck • Maximum 6000rpm


• Weight: 750g Code


S33155 Description


Flexible Drive Shaft with Keyless Chuck


UOM Price EACH £19.95


• A*F Swiss • Good quality for fine work • Spring loaded, spiral system • Steel chuck and brass handle • Chuck closing completely • Overall length 100mm


MANUAL HAND DRILLS Archimedean Drills


A hand drill is a manual tool that converts and amplifies the circular motion of the crank into the circular motion of a drill chuck.


Miniature Archimedean drills are drills which are a small spiral type hand drill which operates by pushing the center piece up and down.


• Spring loaded and non spring loaded • Extra large available


Archimedean, Regular


• For fine drilling of holes • Easy to use • Hold from the top knurled handle and push down the barrel which rotates the drill head


• Capacity Approx Ø0.10 to Ø1.40mm • Comes with two chucks • Overall length 190mm


Code D34916 Description Archimedean, Extra Long


UOM EACH


Price £1.95


Archimedean, Extra Large (Wooden Handle)


• For fine drilling of holes • Easy to use • Hold from the top knurled handle and push down the barrel which rotates the drill head


• Capacity Approx Ø0.30 to Ø1.00mm • Overall length 100mm


Code D39352 Description Archimedean, Regular


UOM EACH


Price £1.95


• For fine drilling of holes • Easy to use • Hold from the top wooden handle and push down the barrel which rotates the drill head


• Capacity Approx Ø2.00 to Ø2.30mm • Overall length 270mm


Code D39355 Description


Archimedean, Extra Large (Wooden Handle)


UOM EACH Price £3.95 Code D47302 Description UOM Archimedean, Sprung, A*F Swiss EACH Archimedean, Extra Long Price £15.95


• For fine drilling of holes • Easy to use • Hold from the top knurled handle and push down the barrel which rotates the drill head


• Spring action lifts head back to position for constant action


• Capacity Approx Ø0.30 to • Overall length 100mm


Code D0444 Description Archimedean, Sprung


UOM EACH


Archimedean, Sprung, A*F Swiss


Price £2.95


The traditional jewellers bow drill is functioned by moving the wooden handle up and down triggering the drill bit to rotate. Even though this may look complicated it is actually very simple to use with just a little practice and has a good, even drilling action. Jewellery drills, twist drill bits, diamond coated drill bits and rotary burrs can all be used with your bow drill


Putting together your Bow Drill:


First, slot the wooden handle over the metal shaft through the middle hole.


Secure a knot in one end of the cord and thread the other end up through one of the end holes in the wooden handle. Make sure the knot is on the underside of the handle.


Thread the cord through the hole in the top of the metal shaft and down through the other side of the wooden handle. Secure a knot to hold it in place under the handle as you have on the opposite side.


How to use your Bow Drill:


The drill can look a bit complex to use but it’s truly a very simple procedure which you will soon get to master. If you are drilling sheet metal, it is a good idea to mark the point to be drilled with a center punch as this will give you a good initial point for the drilling and should help avoid the drill bit from gliding across your work.


Place the drill bit over the point to be drilled and twist the shaft whilst gently holding the handle. This will wrap the cord around the shaft and draw up the handle.


Functioning the drill only requires one hand so the other is free to hold your work if required. Place two fingers on the wooden handle either side of the shaft and push down gently. This will begin the momentum needed for the drilling action. Once the handle reaches the bottom it will begin to rise back up the shaft, so allow your hand to raise with it before pushing back down when the handle has returned to the top. This should become a smooth flowing action and the drill


will build up speed as you work. Code


Description


D34938 D35291


Bow Drill, Traditional Bow Drill with Wooden Handle Hand Drills


A hand drill is a manual tool that converts and amplifies the circular motion of the crank into the circular motion of a drill chuck.


• Traditional hand drill • “Eggbeater” type drill • Has comfortable wooden handles


• Excellent smooth gear system • Collet from 0 to 4.5mm • Made in India • Very good for twisting wire for obtaining a pattern effect


• Weight 700g Code


D20867 Description Hand Drill with Chuck


UOM Price £5.95


EACH


UOM Price EACH


EACH Archimedean, Sprung Bow Drill


£7.95 £9.75


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