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38 In-season produce is king


There’s nothing quite like summer for people who love to cook good fresh, local food for those they love.


The fields and farms


Jude’s Kitchen JUDIE STEEVES


are ripe with fruit and vegetables, meat and herbs, just waiting for the opportunity to grace your plate. Having the bounty of summer at your


disposal is like providing fresh paints and an empty canvas to a painter: the excitement of inspiration gets the creative juices flowing and magic is the result. At the same time we’re enjoying the flavours of all this fresh


produce and local meats, our bodies are particularly well- nourished by the freshness of what we’re eating, and our neighbours are benefiting from our local purchases. It’s a win- win-win. Spring, summer and fall in BC are special seasons for inspiring chefs, with an ever-changing variety of options to highlight the fresh and the local foods of this province, including herbs, cheeses, seafoods, vinegars and wines. If you don’t grow or make your own, patronize your local


farmer’s market, where your friends and neighbours have already harvested or prepared some tasty and unique food for your table. Enjoy the outdoors, whether hiking in the alpine or swimming the lakes or ocean, and you’ll find your appetite matches the bountiful harvest that’s available, and your body will benefit from both the exercise and the fresh nourishment. Enjoy the harvest and summer outdoors in BC. Eat well and


entertain others.


COUNTRY LIFE IN BC • AUGUST 2019


Pork tenderloin made special with a slice of pear and dab of blue cheese. JUDIE STEEVES PHOTO BARBECUED PORK & PEAR BITES with a BLUEBERRY-BALSAMIC REDUCTION & BLUE CHEESE


1-1 1/2 lb. (454-680 g) pork tenderloin coarsely-grated pepper & salt blue cheese


fresh slices of pear


Blueberry & Balsamic Reduction 1/2 c. (125 ml) blueberries, fresh or frozen 1/2 tsp. (2 ml) brown sugar salt & pepper, to taste


drizzle of brandy


blueberry & balsamic reduction (see below) dried Ocean Spray cranberries fresh thyme sprigs, to garnish


2 tbsp. (30 ml) good balsamic vinegar 1/2 tsp. (2 ml) thyme leaves


• Drizzle the brandy over a pork tenderloin and rub it all over, then coat the entire piece with a crust of coarsely -grated black pepper and salt.


• Prepare the blueberry & balsamic reduction: Put all ingredients into a small pot over medium heat and stir together, gently bruising the blueberries so they release their juice. Let simmer, gently, for 10-15 minutes until the sauce becomes thick. Set aside. • Crumble blue cheese and set aside. • Pre-heat the barbecue, then sear the tenderloin on all sides. Reduce the heat slightly and roast it on the barbecue for 15-20 minutes or until the interior temperature is 130°-140° F or so. It will continue to cook once it’s been removed from the heat and allowed to settle, but should be slightly pink inside still.


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• Core and thinly slice the pear. After it’s sat for a few minutes, slice the pork into 3/8” slices. • To serve on individual small plates, smear each plate with the blueberry and balsamic reduction, top with a slice of pork and top the pork slice with crumbled blue cheese, a dried cranberry and a slice of pear.


• Garnish with fresh thyme sprigs and serve as an appetizer for a dozen or so; or put two or three slices on a plate for a smaller gathering.


PEACH & PROSCIUTTO SALAD


Use a good balsamic vinegar for the vinaigrette as well as a good-quality olive oil. It makes such a difference to the flavour of a salad dressing. This makes a filling lunch salad accompanied with a crusty baguette, or serve it as a dinner appetizer for more people.


4 thin slices prosciutto Email SHARE WITH A FRIEND!


4 c. local, young salad greens 2 tree-ripened peaches


chiffonade of fresh basil leaves


Balsamic Vinaigrette 1 small clove garlic


3-4 tbsp. (45-60 ml) extra virgin olive oil 1/4 tsp. (1 ml) fresh-ground black pepper


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2 tbsp. (30 ml) balsamic vinegar 1/4 tsp. (1 ml) sea salt peach juice


• To prepare the vinaigrette, mince the garlic into a small jug or jar with a tight-fitting lid and add the vinegar and oil, salt and pepper and peach juice and mix well just before pouring over the salad. Use a small whisk for the jug or shake the jar.


• For the salad, cut thinly-sliced prosciutto, a dry-cured Italian ham, into slices and grill until slightly crisp, then drain on paper towels.


• Toast raw pecan halves in a dry frypan over medium heat for just a few minutes, until aromatic, and cool.


• Rinse, dry and tear a selection of seasonal, local salad greens into a salad serving bowl or onto a large platter.


• Cut a small cucumber into half-inch dice and sprinkle on top of the greens. • Peel and slice ripe, local peaches into a small bowl and cut the slices in half. Arrange on top of the greens and pour the peach juice into a small jug or jar to use in making the vinaigrette. • Crumble a chunk of blue or feta cheese over top of the salad. • Drizzle with the balsamic vinaigrette. Top with the crisp prosciutto, toasted pecans and thinly- sliced basil leaves and serve immediately. Serves 4.


2 tbsp. (30 ml) toasted pecans 1 small cucumber blue or feta cheese


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