search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
26


COUNTRY LIFE IN BC • FEBRUARY 2019


Agreement sets stage for fish farm phase-out Broughton Archipelago's implications for other Crown tenure holders unclear


PORT McNEILL—The


province, the federal government, two salmon farming companies and area First Nations have agreed to a plan that will close 17 salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago between Vancouver Island and the BC mainland.


The plan is to immediately decommission some farms, while some will remain in operation for up to four years. By the end of 2022, 10 farms will have ceased operations. The remaining seven farms will cease operations in 2023 unless licence agreements are reached between First Nations and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans before then.


The two companies


involved, Mowi (formerly Marine Harvest Canada, which has 12 farms in the area) and Cermaq Canada (operator of five farms), say they support the solution to a controversy that has seen protests, occupation of farms, police


monitoring of fish transfers and court injunctions to prevent activists from occupying farm properties.


Moving forward “We are pleased to move


forward, together, in a way that will help to protect and enhance wild salmon populations and ensure the continued sustainable and responsible production of farmed salmon for generations to come,” says David Kiemele, managing director of Cermaq Canada. “We approached these discussions seeking solutions that would both address the concerns of the First Nations and maintain our commitment to the well- being of our employees, support businesses, and stakeholders,” says Mowi managing director Diane Morrison. “Going forward, we see the implementation of the recommendations as a positive step toward building mutual goodwill, trust and


Producer Check-off Supports Beef Industry Projects.


www.cattlefund.net 1.877.688.2333


respect as we work to earn First Nations consent of our operations in their territories.” Mowi has operated in the


Broughton area for the past 30 years. Annual production from the area is 12,000 tonnes of salmon worth approximately $200 million to the local economy while providing 461 jobs. Jeremy Dunn, public affairs


director for Mowi, says the companies appreciated being included in the government- to-government committee established to make recommendations on the future of the fish farms. “We met with them


numerous times. We had the opportunity to listen to First Nations, but also they took a good approach in listening to us as well – about our business, about how it works and about the people involved,” says Dunn. “Through that listening we were able to have good engagement. We were able to review their recommendations in advance and provide feedback that we agreed with the recommendations that the committee put forward.” Both companies aim to maintain harvest volumes by shifting production to other sites, applying for licence and


PROVINCIAL LIVESTOCK FENCING PROGRAM Applications Close:


September 30, 2019 View program updates at


www.cattlemen.bc.ca/fencing


Office: 1.778.412.7000 Toll Free: 1.866.398.2848 email: fencebc@gmail.com


• BEEF • VEAL • BISON • LAMB • GOAT • DEER


tenure amendments to increase production at some current sites and develop new farm sites in areas where there is First Nations interest. “There is some production


capacity that we will seek to move to other areas, we will seek agreement with our First Nations partners to apply to expand operations in some areas and will be in


discussions about new farm sites,” says Dunn. “There are no changes to employment anticipated at this time.” He notes that Mowi consults with First Nations on a regular basis, and would secure their partnership and support prior to submitting any new farm application. The four fish farm


companies that operate in BC have operating agreements with some 20 First Nations, save those in the Broughton Archipelago. The agreements typically confer benefits on local First Nations.


Decommission process The federal and provincial


governments along with First Nations is developing a monitoring program for the Broughton Archipelago to oversee the transition of farms out of the area. To decommission a farm, all floating infrastructure –


including the net pen, barge housing mechanical systems, feed storage and offices – is removed, as well as the anchoring system. A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is sent underwater to capture video of the cleared site. Dunn says the


decommissioning process is a considerable expense for which the companies have not sought compensation. Instead, funding from both


levels of government was requested for wild salmon restoration and wild salmon research projects. “We have asked for funding


MEADOW VALLEY MEATS PROVINCIALLY INSPECTED ABATTOIR BC#34


CUSTOM SLAUGHTER SERVICES PROVIDED Serving the Community Together


WANTED: ALL SIZES MARKET GOATS & LAMBS WEEKLY FARM NEWS UPDATES 18315 FORD ROAD PITT MEADOWS, BC V3Y 1Z1


ashiq@meadowvalleymeats.com 604/465-4752 (ext 105) fax 604/465-4744


countrylifeinbc.com Sign up for FREE today.


Helping Y


Helping You YOUR


from both levels of government to be put into wild salmon restoration,” he says. “Wild salmon research is where we believe government funding is best spent.” Dunn says Mowi will continue working towards improved relationships with the communities in which it operates and those speaking for local interests. It’s part of maintaining a social licence to operate as a business, but also integral to the kind of reconciliation the province is pursuing with First Nations. “The community needs to see that the operations are something that they benefit from,” he says. “That relationship is partly created through openness and transparency but also through employment, economic development and, in many areas, we play a significant role in the overall economy of the community.”


Feb 16, 2019 :Feb 16, 2019 : 24 ch 30, 2019


24th


4th Annua


all


Pine Bue Ranch Hereford Sale, Kamloops March 30, 2019: 46th


19 46th Annua Apr 13, 2019 Apriil 13, 201 44th Annua all all


Dawson Creek All Breeds Bull Saleal 19 : 44th Annua


a


Vanderhoof All Breeds Bull Saleale 9 82


Apr 17 & 18, 2019: Apriil 17 & 18, 2019 In partnership with: Williams Lake Bull Show & Sal


9: 82nd Annua aleale


nua all Accountable le Predictablelle


BCHA President John Lewis 250-218-2537


BCHA Secretary Janice Tapp


250-699-6466 Profitablelle Sustainablelle ps


British Columbia


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47