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COUNTRY LIFE IN BC • FEBRUARY 2019


Protect farmland from cannabis production The beef about climate


Editor: Re: ‘Green rush’ overwhelms OK planning staff,


January 2019 Why are Rick Fairbairn and the Village of Lumby


supporting a non-farm use application in rural Lumby that would allow a privately owned company from


Letters


Ontario to build buildings with concrete floors totaling 107,000 square feet, pave a 30-car parking lot and shipping/receiving bays on ALR land instead of directing them to Lumby's industrial park? How can this get supported when the buildings


and proposed septic field would border a creek that feeds the Shuswap River 600 metres away? How can something that would completely change the fabric of a neighbourhood be supported without considering the impact on neighbours and without any public input? This facility would be located on a dead-end dirt


road 12 kms outside of Lumby in a rural area of small acreages where families live and children play outside. There are 13 children that live and play on Shafer Road. The property has been logged and there is no


way you can hide the massive 107,000 sq. ft. buildings that they plan to build. One neighbour’s front door is only 50 metres away. Who wants to live beside large industrial buildings surrounded by 10-foot chainlink fencing, exterior lighting, HVAC systems and a 24/7 guard? This facility will not be as tall but will be larger in square footage than VegPro. The exterior lights from VegPro light up the whole highway when you drive by. This is not the


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place for a facility of this size. Our ALR land should be protected. This land will


never be farmable again if Green Amber builds their facility! When the cannabis gold rush ends and if Green Amber fails, who will clean up the mess they leave behind? Our regional directors do have the power to stop


this. The ALC will not look at any non-farm use applications if local government does not support it. Mike Cadden & Trish Cory Lumby


Dog owners need to


accept responsibility Editor: Re: Livestock protection is a grey matter,


January 2019 I read Back Forty by Bob Collins and disagree with the conservation officer’s statement that only a conservation office may kill dogs. You will not find that in the Livestock


Protection Act. The appeals judge in the Sharpe Lake case said no one would be able to shoot a dog in a herd [it was] viciously attacking. That the dog was at large was reason enough to shoot it.


The rancher was declared innocent. The SPCA is totally out of touch with reality. The RCMP and conservation officers would be too far away to help, and avoid dog problems like the plague. Canada has let irresponsible pet owners off too easy for years. We are all responsible for the animals and pets we choose to own. Dale Wideman Bridge Lake


change Editor: Country Life in BC deserves an A+++ rating for its December 2018 issue. You covered every agricultural product made in BC and even addressed climate change in Bob Collins’ The Back Forty.


Bob almost had me convinced that he was seriously considering practicing what he was preaching until I read his tagline, which told me he is a beef producer. Bob will have to reduce or even eliminate his beef


production if he really believes what he is writing about the rise of temperatures as a result of carbon dioxide increases in our atmosphere. Cattle, and particularly beef, are known for their methane emissions. Methane is 36 times stronger than carbon dioxide and warms the atmosphere 86 times faster. So, if you are serious in promoting climate


change, Bob, sell your cattle and stick to growing produce. You can still use those empty sheds for countering climate change by installing solar panels on the roofs. You ended your article fittingly with the words


that we need “to close ranks and prepare for what’s coming.” The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gives us until 2030 to get our act together or we are going to doom our kids and grandkids to an unknown and probably devastating future. Frank Martens Orchardist Summerland


Country Life in BC welcomes letters to the editor but reserves the right to edit for clarity and length. Send your thoughts to: editor@countrylifeinbc.com


We cut everything, except corners.


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