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33 A lesson in


underfloor heating


Mark Crowsley of Cellecta discusses the continued need for large new schools to install underfloor heating floating floor solutions that achieve excellent acoustic performance as well as efficiency


chools can be noisy environments – excessive background noise, loud corridors, and adjoining rooms with differing sound requirements equate to a bigger conundrum than that of separating floors and walls in apartments. Get this wrong and it can affect concentration and levels of learning.


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Utilising the stipulations laid out in both Building Bulletin 93 and Part E of the Building Regulations, manufacturers are able to put forward a suitable solution that can answer a multitude of situations. The key questions for such projects in terms of underfloor heating systems include: • how is the building’s structure constructed?


• what are the requirements for each room and separating element?


ADF APRIL 2019


• is the underfloor heating system suitable for activity in the room, and is it the most efficient for its thermal performance and response?


Working alongside the specifiers, contractors and interior fit-out supply chain at key stages allows the manufacturer’s technical team to offer the most suitable solution.


In a plethora of school projects across the country, there has been an increase in requirements for both better acoustic performance and underfloor heating solutions that are more responsive. In the UK we can experience a multitude of different weathers in one day – cold in the mornings and mild in the afternoons.


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