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their version sound like the original. Beyond just learning the arrangement their goal was to really try to match the sound of the original as a group, and they were inspiring each other to find new sounds in their own playing.


Te great jazz trumpeter Clark Terry sums up this learning process wonderfully. He breaks it down to just three words: “Imitation, Assimilation, Innovation.” We imitate what we hear until we assimilate it into what we play, and only then can we use it to innovate and create something new. Just like in learning a foreign language, it is the completion of all three steps that gets us past the analytical process of gram- mar. It’s what eventually allows us to improvise freely in music and really begin to speak the language of jazz.


------ A few suggested solos for beginning transcription:


• Miles Davis trumpet solo on “So What” from his album Kind of Blue


• Art Farmer trumpet solo on “Killer Joe” from the album Meet the Jazztet


• Chet Baker vocal scat solo on “It Could Happen to


You” from his album (Chet Baker Sings) It Could Happen to You


• Wynton Kelly piano solo or Miles Davis trumpet solo on “Freddie Freeloader” from the Miles Davis album Kind of Blue


• Lester Young saxophone solo on “Back to the Land” from his album Te Lester Young Trio


• Louis Armstrong trumpet solo on “Potato Head Blues” from Louis Armstrong and the Hot Seven


• Dexter Gordon saxophone solo on “Cheesecake” from his album Go


Matthew Fries is Assistant Professor of Keyboard Jazz Studies at Western Michigan University. Originally from central Penn- sylvania, he holds degrees from Ithaca College (B.M.) and the University of Tennessee (M.M.). Fries lived and worked in New York City for over twenty years performing and touring with a long list of musicians. He is the winner of the Great American Jazz Piano Competition and his work as a sideman has been called “the best jazz accompaniment I’ve seen in a cabaret in years” (Te New York Times) and “the crispest rhythm section imaginable” (Te London Times).


This year’s headliners are:


Thursday Evening Concert to Feature


Grand Rapids Symphonic Band MSBOA Dr. Sarah McKoin MMEA Dr. Artie Almeida An exciting event produced by a partnership of:


Michigan Chapter of the American String Teachers Association | Michigan Music Education Association | Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association | Michigan School Vocal Music Association


www.MichiganMusicConference.org Questions: info@MichiganMusicConference.org 12 MSVMA


Lynn Brinckmeyer & Emily Ellsworth


MASTA Charles Laux


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