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AMEA 2019 Clinicians


Kristi Howze has been teaching for the past twenty-four years. Mrs. Howze earned her Bachelor of Music degree from Samford University and her Masters in Education at Auburn University. During Mrs. Howze’s twenty-four years of teaching she has not only taught elementary music, but has also had experience teaching 3rd


, 4th, and 5th grades as well as high school chorus. She is


currently the Lower School Music teacher at UMS-Wright Preparatory School in Mobile, Alabama. During Mrs. Howze’s fourteen years at UMS-Wright she has directed over 75 fully staged musicals with elementary and middle school students.


Jane Kuehne (Ph.D.) is Associate Professor of Music Education at Auburn University where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music education, and supervises graduate research. Her primary research and study areas include teaching sight-singing, pre-service music educator biases, string/orchestra music education access and opportunity (with Dr. Guy Har- rison), and most recently critical race theory (theories) self-study and effects of bias in education.


Dave Lawson is a highly trained woodwind clinician that has been teaching woodwinds for over 13 years. He earned his Bach- elor’s in Clarinet performance and Music Education from Reinhardt College (University). He has taught clinics from elementary school beginners to high school seniors auditioning at the college level. He has learned from and taught next to such esteemed directors as Mrs. Mary Land, while she was the director at Pickens Middle School, and Daniel Gray, while he was at River Ridge High school. Dave is a professional clarinet and alto sax player, recently performing with Tara Winds at their GMEA Perform- ance in January of 2014 and again at Midwest in December of 2015. Dave regularly performs with The Dalton-Whitfield Com- munity band in Dalton, GA, the Alpharetta City Band in Alpharetta, GA, and the American Patriot Winds in Woodstock, GA. Dave has studied clarinet with Andrea Strauss, Mariano Pacetti, John Warren, and both clarinet and sax with Mitchel Henson. Dave maintains a busy private studio that ranges from beginners to retired beginners from 7-67. All of Dave’s middle and high school students are required to audition for All-state. Dave’s studio is fast paced, intense and filled to the brink with fun. Dave also runs a woodwind repair shop where he fixes instruments for schools and private students. Currently, we have three ap- prentice woodwind techs and nearly 150 instruments that our shops owns that we are fixing, renting, or selling. Dave has also taught numerous repair courses throughout the southeast. In 2017, Dave taught sessions at the Alabama Music Educators Con- vention (AMEA), the Georgia MEA, the Tennessee MEA, West Georgia, and Reinhardt University.


Rob Lyda is the music teacher at Cary Woods Elementary School in Auburn, Alabama. Throughout his career he has taught music classes for students in grades K - undergraduate. He earned the BME at Troy University and the MEd and PhD in Music Education from Auburn University. In addition to his academic degrees, he completed studies in in Kodaly, World Music Drumming, TI:ME, is an Orff-Schulwerk (Levels I-III & Master Class) certified teacher. Rob regularly presents sessions on technology integration and general music education at state, regional, and national conferences. He contributes curriculum materials for NAfME publications, the Alabama Symphony’s children’s concerts, and other state and national groups. He holds memberships in Alabama Music Educators Association, the National Association for Music Education, American Orff Schulwerk Association, Phi Kappa Phi, and the National Band Association. Currently, he serves as the National Chair of the NAfME Council for General Music Education and Secretary of the Elementary Division of AMEA.


Mary McGowan is in her 25th year of teaching instrumental music and her 3rd year as the Director of Bands at Adamson Middle School in Rex, GA. Her Bands have consistently earned Superior Ratings at performance evaluations and music festivals in Georgia, North Carolina, Illinois, Tennessee, Louisiana and Florida. Her students have participated in GMEA District 5 and 6 Honor Bands. Students under her direction have also been accepted as fellows with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra’s Talent Development Program. She has served as a clinician/session presenter for Atlanta Public Schools, Clayton County Schools, Woodruff Arts Center in Atlanta, Georgia (2017) and the Alabama Music Educators Association In –Service Conference. (2018) Previous teaching experiences include New Orleans Public Schools, Atlanta Public Schools. Clayton County Public Schools and Spelman/Morehouse Colleges. She is also a Volunteer Family Mentor on the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra’s Talent Development Program committee. Ms. McGowan is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music, and received a Master of Secondary Education Degree from Southeastern Louisiana University, and is pursuing an Educational Specialist Degree in Music Education at Piedmont College. She also is a private instructor in clarinet and oboe.


Dr. Cara Morantz joined the faculty at UAB as Assistant Director of Bands in the fall of 2014. She is a part of the instructional team for the Marching Blazers, the Wind Symphony, the Symphony Band, and the Blazer Bands. In addition, she provides instruction in music classes including courses in music education.


46 October/November 2018


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