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18 By John Jeter


Just when shipping lines thought the sailing would be smoother


a decade aſter the great roiling of 2008, uncertainty over trade


Issue 7 2018 - FBJNA


///BREAKBULK


Break bulk shipping not quite a good feeling


“That’s the theme of 2018:


wars appears to be rising in line with the reported 30% increase in global demand for maritime transport.


‘Hey, this is a really good feeling,’ and then the tariffs came in,” says Brent Berg, Vice President, Business Development at Thorco Projects. With the Trump Administration enacting levies


REROUTE YOUR THINKING™


“Our cargo is mostly oil-field related. The past few years have been very bleak, at best.”


-- Brittany Clark, UAL America


on some $85 billion worth of goods and retaliatory tariffs from five major U.S. trading partners doubling that, could a trade war torpedo break bulk’s turnaround? Tariffs, says Berg, aren’t a “deal-


breaker, you just kind of deal with it, but I think the recovery could have maybe been a whole lot better or faster. I think a lot of people are just trying to be really cautious and trying to figure out how to deal with high levels of uncertainty coming from the governments around the world.” Renewables and oil and gas


projects are helping refuel break bulk’s energy, C-suiters say. Universal Africa Lines (UAL)


MORE BREAK-BULK CAPACITY. MORE BREAK-BULK EXPERIENCE. LET’S GET TO WORK FOR YOU.


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$70-per-barrel range in the last two years, according to NASDAQ. “Our cargo is mostly oil-field


related. The past few years have been very bleak, at best,” says


capital. Dan-Gulf’s CaytransBBC


handled “about 8,000 cubic meters of fiber glass


19 >>


sees rising oil prices helping fuel their West Africa break bulk trade; the benchmark crude-oil price has nearly doubled to the


Brittany Clark, Vice President, Business Development at UAL America. “However, as oil prices recover, our clients are gradually regaining confidence and spending is increasing. The phones are starting to ring again, and it’s nice to hear.” In August, Bloomberg


reported that “from liquefied natural gas in Mozambique to deep-oil in Guyana,” investments among the world’s largest energy companies will rise to about $300 billion through 2020, more than the previous three years, through 2017, combined. Speaking of the South


American nation, no sooner did one shipping executive send an email saying, “Guyana is hot right now,” than Dan-Gulf Shipping Inc. sent an announcement about a major project in Georgetown, the


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