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Why We Live Here


The Isle of Wight is full of people from all walks of life. From those who were born and raised here — and never wanted to leave, to those who came once for a holiday and decided the lifestyle was perfect for them. Some choose the Island for their young families, others make it a base for unique businesses. With such great commuter links, the Isle of Wight also makes the perfect evening and weekend escape from a job in the city.


Here’s a little insight into the reasons why some Islanders have made this beautiful place their home.


Immy Bawdon loves taking a stroll on the Island and stumbling across an authentic little gem of a country pub or quaint english tearoom which you never knew existed.


“I think you can live here all your life, and still have not been everywhere and seen everything,” she said.


Immy set up Richmonds Bakery in 2017, but says it really began when she was just 14, falling in love with baking in both her Nan’s and Grandma’s kitchens.


“I was still at school when I started selling cakes on the weekends and in the holidays — and after doing my GCSEs and A-Levels, I decided that university wasn’t for me, so I gave the bakery a proper go. One year on, we have just opened our first shop in Cowes.


“I was raised in Shanklin Old Village until I was 16 and had the best time growing up there. We had a beach hut along Sandown seafront, so I always looked forward to the summers. However there was always something special about Shanklin in the winter, when all of the tourists have gone — you feel like you have the place to yourself,” she said.


Immy recommends walking along Ryde Seafront, down to the Dell Cafe on a summer’s evening, and having a glass of wine while watching the sun set. “You can’t beat the view,” she said.


Richmonds Bakery


11 Bath Road, Cowes, PO317QN www.richmondsbakery.co.uk


Jeremy Seale moved to the Island's coastal town of Cowes for the convenience of the commute to and from Central London. He was eventually drawn to relocate here full time, a decision about which he is very happy.


Jeremy now works for a fine art gallery in Cowes, which specialises in original artwork with a nautical focus.


“At Kendalls Fine Art, we are truly blessed to represent Island artists, along with many other equally talented artists from around the world with links to the Island.


“I am passionate about artwork and fine furnishing and the homes in which we live, Kendalls Fine Art represents this passion, providing a window through which the wonderful items we sell can be viewed and purchased.”


Following his upbringing in London and North Hampshire, Jeremy believes the Island is a special place to now live, offering a unique lifestyle which includes wonderful friends, amazing beaches and stunning countryside for long dog walks. Jeremy feels there are also excellent places to eat or pass precious down time. “An accessible escape from the often frenetic world in which most of us live,” he said.


Jeremy's favourite spot on the Island to visit is Newtown Creek by boat or on foot, for its wonderfully natural beauty, while his favourite establishment is The Hut at Colwell Bay for it’s excellent seafood, attentive service, seaside vibe and views.


Kendalls Fine Art


Bath Road, Cowes, PO31 8QN www.kendallsfineart.co.uk


spencewillard.co.uk


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