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BUILDING FABRIC & EXTERIORS


Keep it natural


Lee Dunderdale of Bradstone delves into the plethora of hard landscaping materials for delivering a dream garden, and explains why natural stone is the perfect choice


W


hen it comes to building your own house, garden landscaping often becomes one of the last jobs on the list. However, despite the unpredictable British weather, Brits are spending 37 per cent more time in the garden than five years ago, so the demand for outdoor space which can be effectively utilised for various personal preferences such as relaxation, family time or entertaining, is on the rise. What’s more, a well-landscaped garden can add anywhere between five to 20 per cent to the value of a property, so it’s worth spending that extra bit of investment to create a well- designed garden.


The way you choose to design the garden should be a reflection of your personal style. You can incorporate your individual tastes, but it’s important to be sensitive to the style of your house too. There are a multitude of hard landscaping products available on today’s market, with materials ranging from porcelain, concrete and natural stone.


Each of these materials offers an abundance of colours and finishes, so it is important to choose the right product for your project. Porcelain provides an elegant finish, and is hard wearing, scratch resistance and low maintenance, while concrete is strong, durable and offers an almost endless choice of colour and texture.


NATURAL STONE


Nothing quite matches the inherent beauty of natural stone as each paver is different from the last with variations of colour and texture determined by nature over thousands of years. Natural stone is incredibly strong and hard-wearing, and at Bradstone we go to extra lengths to source only the finest quality stone which boasts low water absorbency. This means it has a greater resistance to weathering, making it easier to maintain and therefore, will look naturally beautiful for even longer. Smooth Natural Sandstone, for example, can give your patio a touch of exclusivity. The range is beautifully distinctive with its superb


july/august 2018


colour and veining variations, offering a variety of options for self-build projects.


NATURAL STONE WALLING


If you want to have a co-ordinated look within your garden, Bradstone’s new Natural Stone Walling Slips are a quick and easy solution to transform a bland, uninspiring wall. With six options to choose from, the Walling Slips can be added to any structurally sound backing wall, whether it’s concrete or brick, using Bradbond®


structural changes. DESIGN & INSTALLATION


adhesive. The result? A stylish


backdrop for either planting or entertaining which adds shape and texture to the garden without making any


When it comes to designing and installing your hard landscaping, we would always recommend using a Bradstone Assured Installer. With a nationwide network of professional garden and driveway installers, they will be able to offer advice and design inspiration for your self-build. We also offer a 10 year guarantee on all of Bradstone’s products, when installed by an Assured Installer, for total peace of mind.


Lee Dunderdale is product manager at Bradstone


www.sbhonline.co.uk 41


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