search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Brief Summary (For full prescribing information refer to package insert)


INDICATIONS AND USAGE EXPAREL is indicated for single-dose infiltration in adults to produce postsurgical local analgesia and as an interscalene brachial plexus nerve block to produce postsurgical regional analgesia.


Limitation of Use: Safety and efficacy has not been established in other nerve blocks.


CONTRAINDICATIONS EXPAREL is contraindicated in obstetrical paracervical block anesthesia. While EXPAREL has not been tested with this technique, the use of bupivacaine HCl with this technique has resulted in fetal bradycardia and death.


WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Warnings and Precautions Specific for EXPAREL


As there is a potential risk of severe life-threatening adverse effects associated with the administration of bupivacaine, EXPAREL should be administered in a setting where trained personnel and equipment are available to promptly treat patients who show evidence of neurological or cardiac toxicity.


Caution should be taken to avoid accidental intravascular injection of EXPAREL. Convulsions and cardiac arrest have occurred following accidental intravascular injection of bupivacaine and other amide- containing products.


Avoid additional use of local anesthetics within 96 hours following administration of EXPAREL.


EXPAREL has not been evaluated for the following uses and, therefore, is not recommended for these types of analgesia or routes of administration.


• • •





• •


epidural intrathecal


regional nerve blocks other than interscalene brachial plexus nerve block


intravascular or intra-articular use


EXPAREL has not been evaluated for use in the following patient populations and, therefore, it is not recommended for administration to these groups.


patients younger than 18 years old pregnant patients


The potential sensory and/or motor loss with EXPAREL is temporary and varies in degree and duration depending on the site of injection and dosage administered and may last for up to 5 days as seen in clinical trials.


ADVERSE REACTIONS Clinical Trial Experience


Adverse Reactions Reported in Local Infiltration Clinical Studies The safety of EXPAREL was evaluated in 10 randomized, double-blind, local administration into the surgical site clinical studies involving 823 patients undergoing various surgical procedures. Patients were administered a dose ranging from 66 to 532 mg of EXPAREL. In these studies, the most common adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 10%) following EXPAREL administration were nausea, constipation, and vomiting.


The common adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 2% to less than 10%) following EXPAREL administration were pyrexia, dizziness, edema peripheral, anemia, hypotension, pruritus, tachycardia, headache, insomnia, anemia postoperative, muscle spasms, hemorrhagic anemia, back pain, somnolence, and procedural pain.


Adverse Reactions Reported in Nerve Block Clinical Studies The safety of EXPAREL was evaluated in four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled nerve block clinical studies involving 469 patients undergoing various surgical procedures. Patients were administered a dose of either 133 or 266 mg of EXPAREL. In these studies, the most common adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 10%) following EXPAREL administration were nausea, pyrexia, and constipation.


The common adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 2% to less than 10%) following EXPAREL administration as a nerve block were muscle twitching, dysgeusia, urinary retention, fatigue, headache, confusional state, hypotension, hypertension, hypoesthesia oral, pruritus generalized, hyperhidrosis, tachycardia, sinus tachycardia, anxiety, fall, body temperature increased, edema peripheral, sensory loss, hepatic enzyme increased, hiccups, hypoxia, and post-procedural hematoma.


Postmarketing Experience


These adverse reactions are consistent with those observed in clinical studies and most commonly involve the following system organ classes (SOCs): Injury, Poisoning, and Procedural Complications (e.g., drug-drug interaction, procedural pain), Nervous System Disorders (e.g., palsy, seizure), General Disorders And Administration Site Conditions (e.g., lack of efficacy, pain), Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders (e.g., erythema, rash), and Cardiac Disorders (e.g., bradycardia, cardiac arrest).


DRUG INTERACTIONS


The toxic effects of local anesthetics are additive and their co-administration should be used with caution including monitoring for neurologic and cardiovascular effects related to local anesthetic systemic toxicity. Avoid additional use of local anesthetics within 96 hours following administration of EXPAREL.


Bupivacaine


Bupivacaine HCl administered together with EXPAREL may impact the pharmacokinetic and/or physicochemical properties of EXPAREL, and this effect is concentration dependent. Therefore, bupivacaine HCl and EXPAREL may be administered simultaneously in the same syringe, and bupivacaine HCl may be injected immediately before EXPAREL as long as the ratio of the milligram dose of bupivacaine HCl solution to EXPAREL does not exceed 1:2.


Non-bupivacaine Local Anesthetics EXPAREL should not be admixed with local anesthetics other than bupivacaine. Nonbupivacaine based local anesthetics, including lidocaine,


may cause an immediate release of bupivacaine from EXPAREL if administered together locally. The administration of EXPAREL may follow the administration of lidocaine after a delay of 20 minutes or more. There are no data to support administration of other local anesthetics prior to administration of EXPAREL.


Other than bupivacaine as noted above, EXPAREL should not be admixed with other drugs prior to administration.


Water and Hypotonic Agents Do not dilute EXPAREL with water or other hypotonic agents, as it will result in disruption of the liposomal particles.


USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy Risk Summary


There are no studies conducted with EXPAREL in pregnant women. In animal reproduction studies, embryo-fetal deaths were observed with sub- cutaneous administration of bupivacaine to rabbits during organogenesis at a dose equivalent to 1.6 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 266 mg. Subcutaneous administration of bupivacaine to rats from implantation through weaning produced decreased pup survival at a dose equivalent to 1.5 times the MRHD. Based on animal data, advise pregnant women of the potential risks to a fetus.


The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. However, the background risk in the U.S. general population of major birth defects is 2-4% and of miscarriage is 15-20% of clinically recognized pregnancies.


Clinical Considerations Labor or Delivery


Bupivacaine is contraindicated for obstetrical paracervical block anesthesia. While EXPAREL has not been studied with this technique, the use of bupivacaine for obstetrical paracervical block anesthesia has resulted in fetal bradycardia and death.


Bupivacaine can rapidly cross the placenta, and when used for epidural, caudal, or pudendal block anesthesia, can cause varying degrees of maternal, fetal, and neonatal toxicity. The incidence and degree of toxicity depend upon the procedure performed, the type and amount of drug used, and the technique of drug administration. Adverse reactions in the parturient, fetus, and neonate involve alterations of the central nervous system, peripheral vascular tone, and cardiac function.


Lactation Risk Summary


Limited published literature reports that bupivacaine and its metabolite, pipecoloxylidide, are present in human milk at low levels. There is no available information on effects of the drug in the breastfed infant or effects of the drug on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for EXPAREL and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from EXPAREL or from the underlying maternal condition.


Pediatric Use


Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. Geriatric Use


Of the total number of patients in the EXPAREL local infiltration clinical studies (N=823), 171 patients were greater than or equal to 65 years of age and 47 patients were greater than or equal to 75 years of age. Of the total number of patients in the EXPAREL nerve block clinical studies (N=531), 241 patients were greater than or equal to 65 years of age and 60 patients were greater than or equal to 75 years of age. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients. Clinical experience with EXPAREL has not identified differences in efficacy or safety between elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.


Hepatic Impairment


Amide-type local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, are metabolized by the liver. Patients with severe hepatic disease, because of their inability to metabolize local anesthetics normally, are at a greater risk of developing toxic plasma concentrations, and potentially local anesthetic systemic toxicity. Therefore, consider increased monitoring for local anesthetic systemic toxicity in subjects with moderate to severe hepatic disease.


Renal Impairment


Bupivacaine is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. This should be considered when performing dose selection of EXPAREL.


OVERDOSAGE


Acute emergencies from local anesthetics are generally related to high plasma concentrations encountered during therapeutic use of local anesthetics or to unintended intravascular injection of local anesthetic solution.


Signs and symptoms of overdose include CNS symptoms (perioral paresthesia, dizziness, dysarthria, confusion, mental obtundation, sensory and visual disturbances and eventually convulsions) and cardiovascular effects (that range from hypertension and tachycardia to myocardial depression, hypotension, bradycardia and asystole).


Plasma levels of bupivacaine associated with toxicity can vary. Although concentrations of 2,500 to 4,000 ng/mL have been reported to elicit early subjective CNS symptoms of bupivacaine toxicity, symptoms of toxicity have been reported at levels as low as 800 ng/mL.


At the first sign of change, oxygen should be administered.


The first step in the management of convulsions, as well as under- ventilation or apnea, consists of immediate attention to the maintenance of a patent airway and assisted or controlled ventilation with oxygen and a delivery system capable of permitting immediate positive airway pressure by mask. Immediately after the institution of these ventilatory measures, the adequacy of the circulation should be evaluated, keeping in mind that drugs used to treat convulsions sometimes depress the circulation when administered intravenously. Should convulsions persist despite adequate respiratory support, and if the status of the circulation permits, small increments of an ultra-short acting barbiturate (such as thiopental or thiamylal) or a benzodiazepine (such as diazepam) may be administered intravenously. The clinician should be familiar, prior to the use of anesthetics, with these anticonvulsant drugs. Supportive treatment of





circulatory depression may require administration of intravenous fluids and, when appropriate, a vasopressor dictated by the clinical situation (such as ephedrine to enhance myocardial contractile force).


If not treated immediately, both convulsions and cardiovascular depression can result in hypoxia, acidosis, bradycardia, arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. If cardiac arrest should occur, standard cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures should be instituted.


Endotracheal intubation, employing drugs and techniques familiar to the clinician, may be indicated, after initial administration of oxygen by mask, if difficulty is encountered in the maintenance of a patent airway or if prolonged ventilatory support (assisted or controlled) is indicated.


DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Recommended Dosing in Adults Local Analgesia via Infiltration


The recommended dose of EXPAREL for local infiltration in adults is up to a maximum dose of 266 mg (20 mL), and is based on the following factors:


• Size of the surgical site


• Volume required to cover the area •





Individual patient factors that may impact the safety of an amide local anesthetic


As general guidance in selecting the proper dosing, two examples of infiltration dosing are provided:


In patients undergoing bunionectomy, a total of 106 mg (8 mL) of EXPAREL was administered with 7 mL infiltrated into the tissues surrounding the osteotomy, and 1 mL infiltrated into the subcutaneous tissue.


In patients undergoing hemorrhoidectomy, a total of 266 mg (20 mL) of EXPAREL was diluted with 10 mL of saline, for a total of 30 mL, divided into six 5 mL aliquots, injected by visualizing the anal sphincter as a clock face and slowly infiltrating one aliquot to each of the even numbers to produce a field block.


Regional Analgesia via Interscalene Brachial Plexus Nerve Block The recommended dose of EXPAREL for interscalene brachial plexus nerve block in adults is 133 mg (10 mL), and is based upon one study of patients undergoing either total shoulder arthroplasty or rotator cuff repair.


Compatibility Considerations Admixing EXPAREL with drugs other than bupivacaine HCl prior to administration is not recommended. •


Non-bupivacaine based local anesthetics, including lidocaine, may cause an immediate release of bupivacaine from EXPAREL if administered together locally. The administration of EXPAREL may follow the administration of lidocaine after a delay of 20 minutes or more.





Bupivacaine HCl administered together with EXPAREL may impact the pharmacokinetic and/or physicochemical properties of EXPAREL, and this effect is concentration dependent. Therefore, bupivacaine HCl and EXPAREL may be administered simultaneously in the same syringe, and bupivacaine HCl may be injected immediately before EXPAREL as long as the ratio of the milligram dose of bupivacaine HCl solution to EXPAREL does not exceed 1:2. The toxic effects of these drugs are additive and their administration should be used with caution including monitoring for neurologic and cardiovascular effects related to local anesthetic systemic toxicity.





When a topical antiseptic such as povidone iodine (e.g., Betadine®


) is applied, the site should be allowed to dry before


EXPAREL is administered into the surgical site. EXPAREL should not be allowed to come into contact with antiseptics such as povidone iodine in solution.


Studies conducted with EXPAREL demonstrated that the most common implantable materials (polypropylene, PTFE, silicone, stainless steel, and titanium) are not affected by the presence of EXPAREL any more than they are by saline. None of the materials studied had an adverse effect on EXPAREL.


Non-Interchangeability with Other Formulations of Bupivacaine Different formulations of bupivacaine are not bioequivalent even if the milligram dosage is the same. Therefore, it is not possible to convert dosing from any other formulations of bupivacaine to EXPAREL and vice versa.


Liposomal encapsulation or incorporation in a lipid complex can substantially affect a drug’s functional properties relative to those of the unencapsulated or nonlipid-associated drug. In addition, different liposomal or lipid-complexed products with a common active ingredient may vary from one another in the chemical composition and physical form of the lipid component. Such differences may affect functional properties of these drug products. Do not substitute.


CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Pharmacokinetics


Administration of EXPAREL results in significant systemic plasma levels of bupivacaine which can persist for 96 hours after local infiltration and 120 hours after interscalene brachial plexus nerve block. In general, peripheral nerve blocks have shown systemic plasma levels of bupivacaine for extended duration when compared to local infiltration. Systemic plasma levels of bupivacaine following administration of EXPAREL are not correlated with local efficacy.


Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc. San Diego, CA 92121 USA


Patent Numbers: 6,132,766 5,766,627


5,891,467 8,182,835


Trademark of Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc. For additional information call 1-855-RX-EXPAREL (1-855-793-9727) Rx only


April 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30