search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
K L I M K E M A S T E R C L A S S


“T


here’s obviously a need, with over 700 people attending,” Scott Hayes says proudly. “People want to come and learn.” The Canadian event organizer


was excited to present a two-day clinic in March in British Columbia with acclaimed equestrian Ingrid Klimke. Ingrid is a Reitmeis- ter (riding master) in Germany, only the second woman to be so honored; she is a five-time Olym- pian and team gold and silver medalist in event- ing, and is a grand prix dressage competitor. The event was a masterclass, with a through-the-levels


approach to dressage on Saturday and eventing on Sunday. She appreciates the work ethic of North American riders, Ingrid says, noting “they are listening, trying to learn, and they work hard. I like it a lot to come here.” While most of the riders attending the


clinic were fairly local to the Cloverdale, Brit- ish Columbia venue (near Vancouver), being either from western Canada or the western part of the United States, some audience members traveled considerably further. Spectators were in for a treat as they


observed Ingrid affecting improvements in each horse through both the changes she suggested to each rider’s cues, timing and positioning and the exercises she presented. Best of all, it was all done without stress to the horse. That is indeed a masterful balance. Here are highlights of Ingrid’s advice over


the course of the two days. 34 May/June 2018


All photos by Judy Wardrope.


Masterful


Sage Advice to Start The warm-up phase is the most important phase, Ingrid stressed to attendees. There should be a minimum of 10 to 15 minutes of walk on a loose rein, on the buckle if the horse is not too fresh, she said. “Start your work with the pace that suits the horse,


but maintain rhythm and activity. The horse will tell you how much to do. Sometimes that is just the warm up with rhythm and suppleness.” The actual work may only be five to 10 minutes with young horses, she noted. “Consider what the [horse’s] conformation is like. Is it


easy for the horse? Nature makes it easier for some horses and some have to work harder,” she said, encouraging regular walk breaks for youngsters. “Get off their backs. Take a light seat, especially with young horses and in the warm-up for all horses.” “On one hand we have to teach them to be obedi-


ent, but on the other hand they should also be comfort- able.” She encouraged a rider to be willing to experiment with a horse who is acting up; to try something different like a half halt and then a transition, for example. Do not punish the horse in these situations, she said. As she wisely pointed out, walk/trot transitions can make a horse focus on his rider when he is spooky. “We have to be more inter- esting than what he is spooking at,” she said with a laugh.


o


f


f


e


r


s


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76