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SOUTH GARDENS, ELEPHANT & CASTLE, LONDON


23


occasionally consider alternatives for commercial projects, their practice won’t use anything other than brick when it comes to residential developments. “I think the reason we use brick is that it’s the most sensitive choice,” he says. “For people who buy apartments it’s generally the biggest investment they’ll make in their life, and it has to look good and weather well.” All of the brickwork was completed by Lee Marley Brickwork, with whom Maccreanor Lavington have a good working relationship. “What you see when you give bricklayers something a little bit more challenging is they like it, because actually it can be pretty boring building a big wall that’s totally flat!” Maccreanor says. “They like a degree of complexity, many of them are very highly skilled so I think generally they prefer to have a little challenge in their work.”


Going green


The Elephant Park development is one of 18 projects worldwide to be part of the


ADF APRIL 2018


Climate Positive Development Program, which looks for the world’s greenest urban regeneration projects to act as models for future large city developments. As well as solar panels and the CLT-constructed houses, water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has also been considered, manag- ing groundwater and the reuse of water. Brick may not immediately spring to mind when considering sustainable materials, but Maccreanor believes the material has a better sustainability case than many accept, on longevity grounds. “I think the sustainability aspect is just that it requires very little maintenance and it will be there a long time,” he explains. Referencing the demolition of the Heygate Estate he says: “The construction standards in the 1960s were poor, maintenance has been very poor, so it’s right that these projects have to come down but you displace communities. If you have solid brick projects, there’s no reason why they can’t be there for hundreds of years so then you’re also building communities.” 


BALCONIES


Large bay window-style inset balconies are a part of the design that was influenced by traditional London architecture


BRICK SUPPLIERS: SOUTH GARDENS


Freshfield Lane (Anthracite, Lindfield, Lights, Darks, Firsts) Engles Baksteen (Mystique) Ibstock (Ibstock White Engobe) Wienerberger (Black glazed) CPI (Natural Mortar)


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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