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14 KRØYERS PLADS, COPENHAGEN


middlemen throughout the design process.” But, as in any democracy, opposition is a


given. Naturally, their client was also eager to reap the most from the 20,000 m2


plot.


When first designed, Krøyers Plads was programmed as two deep-plan office buildings, and one residential. The overwhelming response from buyers however meant that the programming was changed to make all three mixed-use but primarily residential.


Contextual stories


The brief was to “develop the 20,000 m2 and involve the public in the process”, Harving says. Acknowledgement of the sensitivity of the high-profile site was the first step in producing a design that was to be welcomed by stakeholders. As part of respecting the context, rather than conjuring up an entirely new typology for the buildings, inspiration was taken from the historic warehouses scattered along the harbour. The key design idea was to produce a contemporary vision of this vernacular theme. To this end, Krøyers Plads also pays subtle homage to the “cut-out” appearance and external symmetry of its warehouse neighbours. Harving explains how the facades communicate this symmetry as well as regularity found in the buildings’ antecedents: “the windows follow the same strict size and rhythm, even until they reach the cornice lengths.”


The way in which the new buildings are arranged topographically is also designed to be a continuation of the other warehouses, replicating the even pattern of distribution along the harbourfront – “like pearls in a necklace,” in the architect’s words. “From the harbourfront, you see that the buildings share the same scale,” he says, despite Krøyers Plads’ volumes being much deeper planned than those of its neighbours. The architects delivered this trick thanks to meticulous 3D modelling to get the right mix of height and depth.


VIEWS


Some of the apartments enjoy views over the harbour through generous glazing


The roofs’ angular corners reflect the heights of the neighbouring warehouse structures, maintaining continuity and helping to preserve the city centre skyline, punctured by church steeples. However while providing some continuity of rhythm they also playfully and subtly distort the traditional contours of the original warehouses. Harving also notes that this departure from traditional forms was motivated also by the client’s scramble to maximise the utility of the given space.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK ADF APRIL 2018


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