search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
25


Modern glazing for mental health


ADF reports on some of the drivers which are leading to innovation in glazing mental health units, in order to address a range of particular challenges


he design of environments employed in the care of mentally ill people provides a number of challenges, not least in terms of the windows. An article in the publication Psychiatric


T


Times goes as far as to say that hospitals accommodating mentally ill patients must be “devoid of means to commit suicide”. It states: “The most common type of hazard was ligature anchor points, that is, protrusions capable of supporting the weight of a person more than 100 lbs. In the United Kingdom, hanging was the method used in 77 per cent of inpatient suicides between 1999 and 2007. The most common ligature points were doors, hooks or handles, and windows.”


The specification of fenestration for mental health establishments, however, begs some important questions, which need comprehensive answers from specifiers. Jason Davidson, technical sales director at Crittall Fendor explains: “Depending on the type of building and the specific requirements each patient group might have, natural daylight, ventilation, security, anti-ligature, supervision, window operation and control are all considered.” Unobstructed views onto the exterior spaces are known to aid recovery in some instances and the ability to clean the windows effectively has to be balanced against the need for adequate security. What is key to the optimal specification of a window is accurate knowledge of the precise type of patient group that a hospital – or specific wing of a hospital – serves. For instance, the potential of escape through a window is not always a main issue as some patients within the hospital can leave at any time. For other patient demographics, escape might be of greater concern.


“For years ventilation had been a problem in hospitals and secure units,” says Davidson. “Any openable windows


ADF APRIL 2018 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36