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Roofing


The old adage of “horses for courses” still holds true in many circumstances, but the suitability of alternative waterproofing systems for refurbishment work does offer a wide choice


finished GRP membrane to expand and contract, potentially leading to high stress points at board joints and abutments.


‘WET-LAY’ GLASS REINFORCED POLYESTER COMPOSITE (GRP)


Developed from boat-building, correctly applied, wet-lay GRP systems can work very well, providing the correct weight and continuity of fibreglass reinforcement is used, and the substrate is stabilised to minimise localised movement before laying. Wet-lay GRP can be extremely robust and hard wearing, and can be installed without the need for naked flame use, but wet applied systems are prone to being affected by rain and temperature changes during the installation and curing period. This can severely restrict the amount of time available for waterproofing. As the resin used in these types of system is partially absorbed into the roof substrate, this can restrict the ability of the


MEMBRANE GLASS REINFORCED POLYESTER COMPOSITE (GRP) The difference between this type of system and wet-lay GRP is that with a pre- cured membrane based product, both the membrane and the detailing trims are factory manufactured under ISO 9001 conditions and supplied to site ready for installation, all by mechanically fixing. This can be completed over an existing roof finish, providing that the substrate is in good condition. Additionally, there is no need for a naked flame to be employed during installation. The mechanical fixing can be carried in all weather conditions, however like all liquid applied and wet-lay GRP systems, the air temperature should be consistently above 5°C and the roof surface free of moisture for a successful installation to be completed. In summary, the old adage of “horses for courses” still holds true in many


circumstances, but the suitability of alternative waterproofing systems for refurbishment work does offer a wide choice. Long-term manufacturer guarantees of water tightness covering the first 20


years of an installed roof covering, along with an insured warranty, ease of maintenance and repair contribute to a strong case for liquid and GRP waterproofing systems for housing maintenance.


Andy Fell is the dryseal manager for Hambleside Danelaw Ltd


46 | HMM March 2018 | www.housingmmonline.co.uk


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