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// New York


Garden and the shops of Fifth Avenue. But there are lots of neighbourhoods to explore, all adding to the multi-faceted culture and vibrancy of the city.


If you want to discover the neighbourhoods where New Yorkers live, head out of Mid Town. Chelsea and the Meatpacking Dis trict have plenty of galleries to explore, as well as thriving nightlife. Greenwich Village is full of brownstone apartments, independent shops and specialist food stores. The former industrial areas of Nolita, Soho and TriBeCa are bustling with restaurants, bars, boutiques and cobbled streets. Harlem has an atmosphere all of its own. Once home to some of the greatest black politicians, writers and artists, it has a community feel with a gospel church on almost every corner.


Things to Do There are loads of museums to explore, so Mrs & Mr Jones agreed to pick one each. Mrs Jones was keen to explore MoMA (the Museum of Modern Art). While she enjoyed wandering through Picasso, Pollack, Matisse et al., it was the Warhol that caught Mr Jones’ eye, particularly the Campbell’s Soup Cans and a study of Marilyn Monroe - a vision in gold.


Mr Jones opted for The Met (the Metropolitan Art Museum). They discovered this museum, in Central Park, spans over 5000 years of art. It was the most enormous museum they had visited and they got lost several times. A great tip here is to plan your visit in advance and work out what you really want to see.


From The Met, take a walk through the 800-plus acre Central Park. Mr Jones was keen to pay his respects to John Lennon at the Strawberry Fields memorial. They crossed the road to find his last home, the Dakota Building, on West 72nd Street. Central Park is one of the iconic places to skate in winter. Lace up your skates at the Lasker (northern end), or Wollman (southern end) rinks.


The Jones picked a clear day to see the Statue of Liberty. After a walk around Wall Street and the financial district, they made their way to the East River to board a hop-on hop-off boat. As well as


the spectacular view of the lady herself, they saw the Brooklyn Bridge, Ellis Island immigration centre and breathtaking views of Manhattan Island.


The 9/11 Memorial Plaza and Museum are located next to the new 1 World Trade Centre building (Freedom Tower) in the financial district. While sobering to visit, the Jones’ found it sensitively created and thought provoking. It’s possible to ride 102 floors up to the observation deck of the Freedom Tower for incredible views.


Instead of going up the Freedom Tower, Mr Jones (that old romantic) suggested heading up the Empire State Building for sunset. They made their way up in plenty of time, because it can get crowded. They found the view truly mesmerizing as the sky turned pink, and the city beneath them started lighting up. They warmed up afterwards in the cosy rink-side café of Bryant Park’s Winter Village, where the ice rink sits against the backdrop of the Empire State Building.


While enjoying the main tourist sights in Mid Town, the Jones’ wanted to see some of the city’s cool neighbourhoods. They enjoyed exploring Harlem and Greenwich Village.


One of the best ways to head south is to walk the High Line. This former disused rail track has been turned into a linear park, elevated 2km above the ground. Not only is it a quick way to walk


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