search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
40


blends into the concrete. An ability to overcome this challenge is an indication of just how adaptable metal facades really are. For example, the maximum depth of the window reveal was too large for traditional manufacturing processes and so a multi piece flashing that could be stud-welded and bolted together was designed. This avoided any distortions that would have resulted from traditional welding processes, while creating a bespoke element that could be easily installed on site.


PICTURED The perforated patterns on the brass panels add a sense of mystery to the facade Images courtesy of Aukett Swanke www.aukettswanke.com


The perforated panels were developed in conjunction with the supporting composite panel behind. These had a maximum capac- ity to support the perforated panels, with the required cavity zone, at 750 mm centres. A perforated hook-on panel system was used, set off from the 125 x 50 mm mullions. The panels encompass a PPC black stainless steel bird mesh, carefully integrated into the back to ensure there was no visual impact to the panel face. The Molecular Sciences Research Hub incorporates technical and laboratory areas clustered around a full height atrium, and the striking new hub forms the centrepiece of the Imperial West campus. Laing


O’Rourke commenced construction works at the end of 2014 with completion in 2016. The facade was installed by its in-house team, Laing Facades. Recent advances in metal facades mean that designers are choosing to show off the construction and materials rather than masking them, and Imperial College’s Molecular Sciences Research Hub is a good example of this. It also shows that an increasing number of building designers are creating structures that give a nod, externally at least, to art. In some respects, architecture has always done that, from the elaborate carvings of medieval stonemasons, through to stained glass used by Victorians. They all have one thing in common, which is that the quality of materials should be emphasised in design, not hidden away. Advances in metal cladding allow building designers to do just that, ensuring the ongoing vibrancy of our cityscapes and enabling architects to ‘sell the dream’ to clients of the next awe-inspiring design.


Simon Gregory is sales manager at Proteus Facades


E E Ingleton Engineering Ltd Adelaide Works, 55 Mowbray Street, Sheffield S3 8EZ


Tel: 0114 275 7834 Fax: 0114 272 9672


sales@eeingleton.co.uk www.eeingleton.co.uk


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2017


Perforation with Imagination!


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52