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EUROPEAN COPPER IN ARCHITECTURE AWARDS


Hydropolis © Michal Lagoda (courtesy of European Copper Institute Poland)


Choosing a shortlist from 35 entries, with major public buildings alongside modest domestic schemes, generated lively debate


these copper-clad elements create an easily perceived and high quality urban entity in the complex city environment, managing various changes in level.


The new terminal for intercity buses has a canopy and pillars clad in perforated copper. Next to it, the delicate and airy elevator tower uses glass in both the outer walls and load-bearing structures. Inside the


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glass box, the elevator shaft is covered in copper sheet and copper wire mesh: an elegant counterpart to the powerful and streamlined silhouette of the canopy. This and two other elevator towers, also made of glass and copper, connect the lower level street to the northern bus stop shelters on the street above. The side walls, parapet and face of the bridge structure create an impressive copper portal.


A full report on the terminal was included


in ADF’s Metal in Architecture supplement published in September 2016 – this can be found at www.architectsdatafile.co.uk/adf- supplement-archive


Hydropolis, Poland – Pracownia Projektowa ART FM


A new copper entrance pavilion with an innovative “water printer” sculpture


ADF SEPTEMBER 2017


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