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egg washing


A clean egg is always a good thing, particularly if your customer is selling on their eggs. However, eggs should only really be washed for incubation purposes. Here are a few tips to help keep eggs as clean as possible as well as a lowdown on the


products we offer to clean them if you are planning on incubation.


First and foremost, good management is key. Ensure that your nest boxes are cleaned out


regularly. Another good idea is to place your roosting areas higher than your nest boxes. Chickens like to roost high so this will prevent them from soiling their boxes.


Off course, when dirty eggs can’t be avoided, egg washers are the solution if you plan to incubate the egg. Eggs used for incubation should always be cleaned first but eggs for human consumption should not. Egg shells have a porous micro membrane or cuticle which protects the egg. Therefore, eggs shouldn’t be washed with any old detergent. It’s important to use an effective egg washer in conjunction with a specially designed egg wash formula to give the best results.


Our Rotary Egg Washer is an excellent option as it is a well-equipped complete unit. Features include a thermostatically controlled bucket, motorised base and egg basket. It comes in two different size options to suit any customer.


We supply two options for cleaning to use with the rotary egg washer, our Chicktec® Egg Washer Powder and Liquid. Both offer superb cleaning results without damaging the cuticle of the egg.


For more information or if you require a larger machine than the Rotary Egg Washer please contact us.


T 01246 264650


F 01246 269634


E sales@tusktrading.com


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