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THE NEW JERSEY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION a federated state association of NATIONAL ASSOCIATION for MUSIC EDUCATION News From Our Division Chairs


Administration Ronald P. Dolce


732-574-0846 rdolce561@aol.com


It seems like a few short months ago we were reading the October issue of TEMPO. Here is the May issue with another


school year almost coming to an end. We are now into May and in the middle of our spring music concerts or putting our stu- dents on buses or planes for the spring trip or competition. We are happy to say that we have had many members in attendance at our meetings this year. It has been a busy year for the NJMAA Executive Board and Board of Directors providing informative workshops for the membership. Our first workshop in October, “Nuts and Bolts-Advice on How to Be Successful as an Arts Supervisor” was presented by


Perter Griffin, Supervisor of Performing Arts for the Hopewell Valley School District. The presentation offered ideas to the mem- bers about practical methods used in supervising programs and staff. Our second workshop in December, “Making the Case for Dance and Theater” presented by Louis Quagliato, Supervisor of


Music from the West Orange Public Schools with assistance from teachers from the West Orange School District and the Rahway Public Schools. This presentation discussed the importance of dance and theater programs in schools and the process used to bring these programs to reality. Our February workshop, “Arts and Special Education” facilitated by Joe Akinskas, from Rowan University and Cumberland County College and presented by Maureen Butler, NJMEA Board on Special Learners gave the members an insight and resources for teachers to aid in their teaching of special learners in the music classroom. Our March workshop was, “Transitioning from General Music Class to Performing Arts Class”, presented by Patricia Rowe,


Supervisor from the Moorestown School District. This workshop showed ways that teachers can interest potential performing arts students from classroom activities to the performing activities in the school ensemble program. This year, our members actively presented and participated in the NAfME Eastern Division Conference held in Atlantic


City. Several of our members presented workshops at the conference. Joe Akinskas from Rowan University and Cumberland County College, presented the “Collegiate Forum” and “Open Forum on Instruction.” Bob Pispecky, supervisor from the Edison Public Schools, presented, “Transitioning from Music Student to Music Teacher” and Peter Griffin from the Hopewell Valley School District presented, “Music Student to Music Teacher: Nail Down that Job.” Our Last workshop in June will be held at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. Members will have the opportunity to tour the Kimmel Center and hear about the educational opportunities offered by the staff. As previously mentioned, we continue to have a very good member turn out at our workshops. The success of the New Jersey


Music Administrators Association depends on its members. This year we had an outstanding number of veteran administrators as well as many new faces attend the meeting/workshops. The NJMAA serves as a valuable resource for music administrators and those administrators without a music background to help them work more effectively with their staff and work more efficiently as they support the needs of the music program. Find out more about the NJMAA. Check us out at njmaa.org; become a member.


continued on page 8 TEMPO 6 MAY 2017


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