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AAC F A M I L Y & F R I E N D S


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tion Program (AHPP) is the County Courthouse Restoration Grant Program. Created in 1989, this grant program has helped to extend the lives of court- houses that hold vital links to community pride and local history. Tese grants are funded through the Real Estate Transfer Tax, administered by the Arkansas Natural and Cultural Resources Council. Since the beginning of the program, the AHPP has awarded more than $18.6 million to 69 historic courthouses and courthouse annexes around the state for use in rehabilitating, preserving and protecting these important historic resources. Since 1989, Calhoun County has received 11 grants totaling $460,915 for the Calhoun County Courthouse.


Courthouse Restoration Grants awarded to Calhoun County FY1989


Arkansas Historic Preservation Program County Rehabilitation master plan


FY1990 FY1998 FY2000 FY2003


FY2003 FY2004 FY2006 FY2008 FY2009


FY 2014


Calhoun County has received two AHPP grants to restore the clock tower — in 1990 and in 2014.


TOTAL:


Clock tower restoration Cornice restoration Roof restoration


Window, door and downspout replacement, masonry tuckpointing Additional funding for same Window restoration Masonry restoration


Tuckpointing and painting Tuckpointing


Clock tower restoration, plaster repair, cornice restoration


$6,000


$17,975 $48,000 $30,000


$4,000


$83,000 $37,400 $54,540 $64,000 $13,000


$103,000 $460,915


Among the many programs and services of the Arkansas Historic Preserva-


By 1905, the county quorum court decided that a new facility


was needed and in October directed that a “new and modern courthouse ... be built in the town of Hampton … on the pres- ent Courthouse site.” L.C. Poole was appointed commissioner of public buildings, and he hired architect Frank W. Gibb of Little Rock to design the new structure. E.L. Koonce of Fordyce was hired on October 14, 1909, to build the courthouse. It was completed a year later. Gibb is credited with designing as many as 60 Arkan- sas courthouses, and the Calhoun County Courthouse is one of his finest. Te brick structure reflects elements of both the Romanesque and Classical Revival styles of architecture, with rounded arched windows doorways and windows topped by keystones, a rusticated brick and stone foundation, and a dentiled cornice. Te interior is equally striking, with a multi-colored octagonal ceramic tile floor, ornate woodwork in the offices and staircases, and an elaborate pressed-tin ceiling in the spacious second-floor courtroom. Te county recently painted all of the walls and ceilings and added chair rails, and modernized the court- house with the installation of LED lighting. Te building’s early days are also reflected in the fireplaces in the offices of the sheriff and county clerk, a reminder of the time before central heat and air. Perhaps the most striking feature of the Calhoun County


Courthouse is the 3 ½-story clock tower on the building’s northeast corner. A white-knuckled climb up a series of wooden ladders leads to the bell tower, which provides a panoramic view of Hampton’s business center and the nearby


COUNTY LINES, SUMMER 2015


city cemetery, where a survivor of the 1857 Mountain Meadows Massacre rests next to the soldier who rescued her. Te four- faced clock atop attractive arched brick openings shelters the bell, which bears the inscription “Made for the Seth Tomas Clock Co., New York and Chicago, 1910.” In 2015 as in 1910, the Calhoun County Courthouse re- mains a symbol of pride for a small county with big ambitions.


Calhoun County Judge Floyd Nutt in the bell tower. Te inscription on the bell reads, “Made for the Seth Tomas Clock Co., New York and Chicago, 1910.”


See “COURTHOUSE” on Page 32 >>> 31


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