This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
AAC F A M I L Y & F R I E N D S CHANGING


sails, batten the hatches and hope to wait out the storm. A few see a crisis as an opportunity. It’s difficult to make major changes, even necessary ones, when things are going smoothly. Memorable bosses see instability and uncertainty as an enabler. Tey reorganize and reshape to reassure, motivate and inspire. 2. Wear your emotions on your sleeves. Memorable bosses are highly professional and yet openly human. Tey show excitement when things go well. Tey show appreciation for hard work and extra effort. Tey celebrate, they empathize, and they worry. Sometimes they even get frustrated or angry. In short, they’re human. And, un- like many bosses, they act like it. Professionalism is admirable. Profes- sionalism with a good blend of humanity is inspiring. 3. You’ve been there, done that … and still do that. Dues aren’t paid, past tense. Dues get paid every day. Te true measure of value is the contribution we make on a daily basis. Tat’s why no matter what you may have accomplished in the past, memorable bosses are never too good to roll up their sleeves, get dirty and do the “grunt” work. No job is ever too menial for the memorable boss. 4. You lead by permission, not authority. Every boss has a title. Tat title gives them the right to direct others, to make decisions, to organize and instruct and discipline. Memorable bosses lead because their employees want them to lead. Teir employees are motivated and inspired by the person, not the title. Trough their words and actions they cause their employees to feel they work with, not for, a boss. Many bosses don’t ever recognize there’s a difference. Tere is.


» » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » »


Continued From Page 21 <<<


When Mitch Miller died in July 2010, most people remembered him as the man who invited everyone to sing along. On his popular 1960s TV program “Sing Along with Mitch,” an all-male chorus sang well-loved songs while the words appeared on the screen so viewers could join in. A Los Angeles Times obituary cited Miller’s belief that one reason for the program’s success was the appeal of his chorus: “I always made a point of hiring singers who were tall, short, bald, round, fat, whatever — everyday-looking guys.” From that unified diversity came beautiful music in which everyone was invited to participate. My point? At the beginning of the year we will experience the


“changing of the guard.” Arkansas will have many new leaders in place in state constitutional offices, the state legislature and in county courthouses. At the same time there will be many office holders re-elected to their current office. Te scene will look a lot like Mitch Miller’s chorus — quite diverse. Tere will be male and female; Democrat and Republican, as well as a few from other parties; ultra- liberal, liberal, moderate, ultra-conservative and conservative; and the list of differences could continue. However, there is no reason the outcome could not be the same as Mitch Miller’s chorus — unified diversity. If every elected official will take on the leadership traits we espoused, much good can be accomplished for their constituents and employees — the citizens of this great state. What a unique “choir” we belong to in Arkansas.


COUNTY LINES, FALL 2014


23


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56