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Tournament Offi cial of the Year Sandy Hinzmann


S


andy Hinzmann decided she wanted to join the NCGA as


a tournament offi cial because she was tired of men telling her what to do on the golf course. “They were always telling


me, ‘You can’t do this. You can’t do that. It’s against the rules,’” Hinzmann says. So Hinzmann


Sandy Hinzmann


enrolled in an NCGA Rules Seminar. Inspired by the tutelage of former NCGA Director of Educa- tion and current board member


Gail Rogers, Hinzmann’s passion for the rules grew. So much so, that she has been named the 2013 Tournament Of- fi cial of the Year. “Now the men come to me asking me the rules,” notes Hinzmann, who became a Tourna- ment Offi cial in 2002. Hinzmann works as the man- ager of staff programs for Stanford Research Institute International, the organization that created such notable inventions as the mouse and Siri. Hinzmann describes her job as working for the “Fun and Games Department,” and even helps organize golf outings, among other activities. Now a 22-handicap, Hinzmann’s


favorite golf memory was the thrill of standing over a 20-footer at Kapalua’s Bay Course to shoot 79, as her son drew attention to it with a loud announcement. She missed, but the chance to break 80 still sticks with her. Hinzmann is the tournament


chairman for the association club at SRI, and serves on the USGA’s Women’s Mid-Amateur and Men’s NCAA West Regional committees.


Course Rater of the Year Bill Hagan


B Bill Hagan


ill Hagan didn’t pick up the game of golf until he retired at the age of 54. But as a scientist who had worked in agriculture, agronomy and genetics, he found the way courses are set up and present- ed intriguing. Hagan soon joined the Golf Course Superin- tendents Associa- tion of Northern


California, and volunteered an NCGA Course Rater in 1998. The Sequoyah CC member has been a captain since 2006, and is now the 2013 Course Rater of the Year.


Hagan is still captivated by the


process of rating a course. “You look at so many things,”


Hagan says. “Every golf course is different. It’s a challenge to measure all these different things and come up with something meaningful. “You will come across hazards


that you will see just once or twice in your career.” As a latecomer to golf, Hagan


grew to appreciate the game’s history quickly. His favorite golf memory is a trip with his son to play St. Andrews. Hagan is a 21-handicap, but enjoys the camaraderie that golf brings, both through playing a course and rat- ing one. “I’ve met so many great people through golf,” Hagan says.


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