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SPECIAL F INE ART to the gallery.


“Art collectors and designers have been focusing on large- scale abstracts and geometric art, from black-and-white to full-color scheme. When placed in residential or commercial en- vironments the result is impact- ful,” Kirkpatrick says. She also notes the trend toward modern art.


Regarding work with interior designers, Kirkpatrick says: “A gallery must have a continued dialogue with designers to make them aware of what is available, or new, as the designers make decisions on current and future projects. It’s very symbiotic as a designer may see their vision through a piece of art and ex- pand on that.”


Kevin Tolman, William Campbell Contemporary Art


174 DSD


initiative to learn about our artists and what’s going on in the galleries, and the effect is greatly enhancing their work,” Rathe says.


Mary Tomás Gallery Contemporary art is what interests patrons of Mary Tomás Gallery the most. “From min- imalist to very layered works, the conceptual aspects are important,” says Tomás. She feels museums and institutions are working in tandem with Dallas galleries to heighten the art viewing experience and that the “maverick” spirit is alive and well, with galleries pushing the envelope to stay fresh and relevant. “We are thrilled to have add- ed several international artists to our gallery roster who bring new


visions to the Dallas audience. Artists from Puerto Rico, Spain, New York, France and Texas bring to the table their inspi- rations that incorporate their personal experiences and reflect where they live,” Tomás says, echoing how others feel about Dallas becoming a cosmopoli- tan epicenter for art. “Our patrons are no longer satisfied with just ‘pretty pic- tures,’ and they are finding the value in artworks that exude real emotion,” she says. “Interior designers are see- ing the value they can provide their clients by becoming more informed about the art and art- ists the Dallas galleries have to offer,” says Tomás. She believes a client’s comfort zone can be challenged when it comes to ac- quiring or investing in artwork,


and the guidance of a good interior designer and gallery owner can be critical.


WALL Gallery


Kristi Kirkpatrick, owner of WALL Gallery, feels the art scene has been evolving in Dallas over the last decade, with the Dallas Art Fair gener- ating international notice to our fair city, expanding museum collections, and public spaces being filled with colossal, bright sculptures and murals. With international attention


turning to Dallas’ art scene, Kirkpatrick plans to introduce a few international artists to col- lectors and designers through a rigorous art exhibition schedule. She will also begin exhibiting large-scale sculpture by two different Texas artists, both new


Crawshay Gallery For Phil Crawshay, his large- format digital photography faces a challenge that other art forms do not: The advent of affordable digital equipment, available to everyone, and am- ateur photographers who share what they ate for breakfast as well as selfies with every outfit change on social media, create an impression that photography is not “fine art.” “While this platform has made expression through visual art more ap- proachable, I believe we will see an increased appreciation of art- istry and technique,” Crawshay says. “I think 2017 will see more emphasis on the appreciation of nature and the majesty of the scenery around us, bringing the outside into our homes.” Recently relocating his studio and gallery to Dallas, Crawshay did so because he feels Dallas is a breeding ground for expression. “With the influx of


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