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AltRider SYNCH Dry Bag A bag built for adventure


By Ron Davis #111820


TANK BAGS, BACKPACKS , TOP and side cases, saddle bags, front and rear panniers—the variety and num- ber of ingenious ways manufacturers have come up with for riders to carry their stuff never ceases to amaze me. Whatever solution riders select, I’m guessing their primary concerns are convenience, durability, functionality and cost. Although I never did find out how exactly to pronounce the name, the new SYNCH Dry Bag from AltRider promises to be a “cinch” to get high marks from riders in almost every capacity. Designed to be mounted either


crosswise or lengthwise across the pil- lion seat or rear rack, SYNCH bags are made of heavy, industry standard vinyl-coated fabric, tape seam sealed, which should stand up to just about any kind of abuse. Also like other


ALTRider’s new SYNCH dry bag can be mounted securely either crosswise or lengthwise with the supplied tie downs.


For short hauls off the bike, ALTRider’s new SYNCH dry bag can be carried like a backpack using the included straps.


leading dry bags, the AltRider bags use roll down closures with adjustable straps and nylon clips to seal out rain and dust. The large size SYNCH (38 liters) rolls down from the top, while the medium (25 liter) and small (14 liter) roll down from either end. I had the opportunity to test the medium size, and I decided immediately the end-opening version wouldn’t be great for stowing a lot of small items, since I might have remove a bunch of things to get what I wanted. This style is more suited for holding a few larger items, maybe a sleeping bag or extra jacket, although using two or three stuff sacks to sort items inside the SYNCH could make access easier, and numerous D-rings and “Daisy Chain” loops on the outside of the bag provide anchor points for a smaller odds and ends bag.


Included with the AltRider’s SYNCH bag


are two sets of straps. Two are for tying the bag down, and they use end loops and heavy duty nylon/steel spring clips to make mounting quick and easy. The bag goes on and off in seconds. The other two, what AltRider calls “Stacking Straps” are for lash- ing things like smaller bags, tents, stools, or jackets to the top of the SYNCH, and they clip into D-rings or the Daisy Chain loops. All the straps have elastic “keeper” rings to keep strap ends from flying around. I found the stacking straps provided a handy option of converting the SYNCH into a backpack, nice for carrying stuff to a campsite or motel room. Heavy duty carry handles are also mounted at each end of the SYNCH bags, and they double as tie-down points. AltRider maintains all their adventure


36


BMW OWNERS NEWS March 2016


member tested


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