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MIX IT UP CLASSIC SCRAPERS


Perfect for mixing and scraping batters, doughs and more. Durable, heavy-duty silicone heads are fused directly to the handles, and won’t crack, burn, melt or stain. Heads are heat-resistant to 650°F; handles to 450°F.


J. MINI SKINNY SCRAPER 7¾". #1704 $7.50 


K. SKINNY SCRAPER 10¾". #1655 $9.50 


L. CLASSIC SCRAPER 11". #1650 $12.50 


M. MINI MIX ‘N SCRAPER® 9¾".


#1656 $10.50  N. SMALL MIX ‘N SCRAPER®


#1659 $13.50  O. MIX ‘N SCRAPER®


#1657 $15.50  O 12¼". 10½". N NEW • J K L M


P. STAINLESS WHISK


For stiffer mixtures such as batters. Stainless heads and handles are rust-resistant. 10".


P #2475 $14.00  Q


Q. STAINLESS MINI WHISK For smaller tasks. Stainless heads and handles are rust-resistant. 7½". #2477 $10.50 


R. STAINLESS/SILICONE FLAT WHISK Arched shape is perfect for gravy and roux. Silicone-covered tines are gentle enough for nonstick pans. 10".


R #2482 $19.00 


S. STAINLESS/SILICONE SAUCE WHISK Versatile shape for whisking eggs and sauces. Silicone-covered tines are gentle enough for nonstick pans. 10".


S


#2481 $19.00  T. SPRING COIL WHISK


Quickly mixes eggs, whips egg whites and cream, and blends sauces and gravies. 9".


T


#2486 $6.00  U. EGG SEPARATOR


Rest handle groove on bowl rim, crack egg into the cup and the egg separates.


U


#1187 $7.50  V. MINI-WHIPPER


Mix drinks right in the glass. Stainless. #2635 $5.25 


V 49 X Y W


W. SCOOP & SPREAD Flexible silicone scoop gets to bottom of jars. Serrated nylon end cuts sandwiches, splits bagels and spreads condiments. 10¼" long.


#1679 $8.50 


SPECIALTY SCRAPERS Won’t crack, split or stain, and are safe for nonstick cookware. Silicone heads are fused to nylon handles. Heads are heat-resistant to 650°F; handles to 450°F.


X. MICRO SCRAPER 11¾". #1702 $13.50 


Y. MASTER SCRAPER 11". #1703 $16.50 


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